Abolitionism

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A movement to end the institution of slavery and the worldwide slave trade. The term abolitionists refers to those who were actively against slavery, which movement was mainly in the United States and in Britain. Among Christians, the movement originated with the Quakers in Britain and the US around 1750, and attracted mostly evangelicals. The result was that the international slave trade was made illegal around 1810, and enforced by the British Navy. All the northern states in the U.S. abolished slavery 1777-1803, and the British Empire abolished it in the 1830s in its Caribbean colonies and Canada. (Conservapedia) Modern slavery consists of millions of women and children trafficked as sex slaves, forced laborers in corrupt and oppressive governments or where corrupt organizations have bought off leaders in poor countries.

Just as abolitionists of the 18th and 19th centuries created movements demanding the end to the transatlantic slave trade and the abolishment of chattel slavery in the United States, the persistence of modern forms of slavery around the world today calls for a new, global network of abolitionists. The need for abolitionists – men and women dedicated to attacking slavery in their time – didn’t end with Frederick Douglass, William Wilberforce, the Grimke sisters, William Lloyd Garrison, Elizabeth Cady Stanton or Harriet Tubman. Abolitionists stand up to demand an end to the enslavement of their fellow humans wherever and whenever they see it.

Slavery is still seen in the world today. It bears the essential hallmarks of enslavement that both preceded and persisted after legal emancipation in the United States. Slavery can be defined as the total physical and/or mental control of a person, for purposes of exploiting that person’s labor and body for the commercial or personal gain of another. Ending this ancient crime once and for all is the cause of the modern abolitionist. Attacking slavery today requires understanding all its forms and building a movement to demand its end, everywhere.

The majority of sex slave victims today are runaway or thrown-away youths who live on the streets and become victims of prostitution. These children generally come from homes where they have been abused or from families who have abandoned them. Often, they become involved in prostitution to support themselves financially or to get the things they feel they need or want, including drugs.

Other young people are recruited into prostitution through forced abduction, pressure from parents, or through deceptive agreements between parents and traffickers. Once these children become involved in prostitution, they often are forced to travel far from their homes and, as a result, are isolated from their friends and family. Few children in this situation can develop new relationships with peers or adults other than the person victimizing them. The lifestyle of such youths revolves around violence, forced drug use, and constant threats.

Modern slavery is much more sophisticated than it was in the 18th and 19th century. Abolitionists of today fight slavery such as trauma-based MK-Ultra mind control where young children are subjected to unthinkable trauma which causes them to dissociate from reality and become subject to mind control programming. These mind-control slaves are used as sex slaves, assassins, and other evils. Slaves are still used for labor throughout the world as well. We stand the almighty God of Heaven and Earth in Fighting slavery, who abhors the despicable evil. If we fight for them we are doing God’s work and he will help us in our efforts whether great or small.

Modern abolitionists include (but certainly not limited to) the following individuals:

Chronological History of Events Involving Abolitionists

'The Abolitionists', a Documentary about a Sting Mission by Operation Underground Railroad to Counter Child Sex Trafficking, is Released

‘The Abolitionists’, a Documentary about a Sting Mission by Operation Underground Railroad to Counter Child Sex Trafficking, is Released

The Abolitionists, a 2016 documentary film by Darrin Fletcher and Chet Thomas is released about a sting mission orchestrated in Colombia by the independent Operation Underground Railroad jump team, led by former U.S. Homeland Security Special Agent Timothy Ballard, countering child sex trafficking. Since Operation Underground Railroad (OUR) was formed in December 2013, they've gathered the world's experts in extraction operations and in anti-child trafficking efforts ...
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Brave Young Siblings, Hans and Sophie Scholl, were Executed after they Distributed Literature Alerting People to the Evil of Nazism

Brave Young Siblings, Hans and Sophie Scholl, were Executed after they Distributed Literature Alerting People to the Evil of Nazism

On February 22, 1943—75 years ago today—in Munich, Germany, two siblings made the ultimate sacrifice on the altar of conviction. They risked and lost, fought and failed, but not without leaving a lasting imprint. Their names were Hans and Sophie Scholl. Sophie Scholl, Hans Scholl, and the White Rose movement stood up to the evils of the Nazis. Though they died for their beliefs, their message ...
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Susan B. Anthony cast her Vote on Election Day — Illegally

Susan B. Anthony cast her Vote on Election Day — Illegally

The tactics of the suffragists went beyond petitions and memorials to Congress. Testing another strategy, Susan B. Anthony registered and voted in the 1872 election in Rochester, NY. As planned, she was arrested for "knowingly, wrongfully and unlawfully vot[ing] for a representative to the Congress of the United States," convicted by the State of New York, and fined $100, which she insisted she would never pay ...
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Juneteenth: America's 2nd Independence Day as Slaves are Freed in TX after Major General Granger Enforces Emancipation Proclamation Order

Juneteenth: America’s 2nd Independence Day as Slaves are Freed in TX after Major General Granger Enforces Emancipation Proclamation Order

Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.  Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation - which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation ...
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Abolitionist Julia Ward Howe's Inspiring Lyrics to "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" are First Published in "The Atlantic Monthly'

Abolitionist Julia Ward Howe’s Inspiring Lyrics to “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” are First Published in “The Atlantic Monthly’

"The Battle Hymn of the Republic", also known as "Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory" outside of the United States, is a song by American writer Julia Ward Howe using the music from the song "John Brown's Body." Howe's more famous lyrics were written in November 1861, and first published in The Atlantic Monthly in February 1862. The song links the judgment of the wicked at ...
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John Brown Raided the Federal Arsenal at Harper's Ferry to Obtain Arms for a Slave Insurrection

John Brown Raided the Federal Arsenal at Harper’s Ferry to Obtain Arms for a Slave Insurrection

Just after sundown on the evening of Sunday October 16, 1859 John Brown led a group of 21 men (16 white and 5 black) across the Potomac River from Maryland to Virginia. Their immediate objective was the capture of the cache of weapons stored at the U.S. Arsenal at Harpers Ferry. Brown's ultimate goal was to destroy the slave system of the South. The arms captured by ...
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A NY Tribune Article Suggests that Sharps Rifle was an "effective weapon to fight pro-slavery Democrats" and Becomes known as "Beecher's Bible"

A NY Tribune Article Suggests that Sharps Rifle was an “effective weapon to fight pro-slavery Democrats” and Becomes known as “Beecher’s Bible”

He was one of the most popular preachers in American in the middle 1800s. He was the brother of Harriett Beecher Stowe, who wrote the anti-slavery novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin in 1852. His name was Henry Ward Beecher. He purchased the chains that held John Brown in prison, dragging them across the stage and stomping on them as he preached against slavery. Beecher also supported women ...
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Abolitionist Frederick Douglass Gives Iconic "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro" Speech

Abolitionist Frederick Douglass Gives Iconic “The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro” Speech

Frederick Douglass (1818-95) was a prominent American abolitionist, author and orator. Born a slave, Douglass escaped at age 20 and went on to become a world-renowned anti-slavery activist. His three autobiographies are considered important works of the slave narrative tradition as well as classics of American autobiography. Douglass’ work as a reformer ranged from his abolitionist activities in the early 1840s to his attacks on Jim ...
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Abolitionist, Sojourner Truth, Delivers “Ain’t I a Woman?” Speech at the Women's Convention in Akron, Ohio

Abolitionist, Sojourner Truth, Delivers “Ain’t I a Woman?” Speech at the Women’s Convention in Akron, Ohio

Sojourner Truth was a slave-turned abolitionist. She became a Methodist and was called to ministry. Truth delivered a speech entitled “Ain’t I a Woman?” in 1851 that demanded equality for women and African Americans. As a preacher, she said that Jesus overcame her hatred of white people. Her faith gave her the ability to love everyone. The speech was briefly reported in two contemporary newspapers, and ...
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Seneca Falls Convention, One of the First Women's Rights Conventions to be Held in American History, Begins

Seneca Falls Convention, One of the First Women’s Rights Conventions to be Held in American History, Begins

The American women's rights movement began with a meeting of reformers in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848. Out of that first convention came a historic document, the 'Declaration of Sentiments,' which demanded equal social status and legal rights for women, including the right to vote. Purpose of the Convention The first convention for women's rights in the United States was held in Seneca Falls, New ...
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