Poll: 73% of College Democrats Support Removing Statues of Founding Fathers

A new poll has revealed that an overwhelming majority of college democrats support the removal of statues of America’s Founding Fathers. Students around the nation have launched campaigns that call for the removal of campus statues of American icons such as George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. Only four percent of college republicans agree.

According to a poll by the College Fix, 73 percent of Democratic college students support recent efforts to remove statues of American icons. By contrast, only four percent of Republican college students said that they supported the removal of statues of the Founding Fathers.

Although some leftist respondents conceded that the Founding Fathers made positive contributions to American society, they argue that they should not be “memorialized” on American college campuses because of their attitudes on race.

“The founding fathers did some good things. They also did some bad things. I don’t see why we need to memorialize them,” one Democratic student at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater said.

Some students pushed back against recent campaigns to erase America’s history. One student pointed out that leftists often minimize the flaws of progressive icons like Martin Luther King Jr.

“We don’t expect these people to be perfect, we expect them to be excellent. And by the way, Washington freed his slaves after his death and so did Jefferson (not all, but some). Would you support taking down MLK’s statue because he was homophobic?” a student from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute argued.

Even some educators have been arrested after participating in the destruction of statues of individuals that have shaped the United States. Breitbart News reported in June that Rhode Island middle school teacher Derrick Garforth was arrested in connection to the vandalism of a statue of Christopher Columbus in Providence, Rhode Island.

Breitbart News reported in June that protesters tore down a statue of Thomas Jefferson at a high school in Portland, Oregon. “We’re taking this city back,” one protester said. “One school at a time. One racist statue at a time.”

Stay tuned to Breitbart News for more campus updates.

Congress approves ‘impeachment’ resolution authorizing Schiff’s secret probe of Trump

The US House of Representatives has approved a resolution authorizing the impeachment probe of President Donald Trump, despite Republican opposition arguing that the “Soviet-style” bill lacks transparency and due process.

The 232-196 vote ended up being almost entirely along party lines, with only two Democrats voting against and no Republicans voting for the resolution.

White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham issued a statement strongly condemning the vote, criticizing House Speaker Pelosi’s (D-CA) “unhinged obsession with this illegitimate impeachment proceeding.” The resolution, she argued, only codified “unacceptable violations of due process” in the ongoing inquiry.

The White House has dismissed the impeachment investigation, noting that Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff’s (D-CA) process would continue to be tightly controlled and held in secret, while withholding Republican and White House rights to cross-examine the witnesses and the right to issue subpoenas.

“The Democrats want to render a verdict without giving the Administration a chance to mount a defense,” the statement read.

The White House also condemned the resolution and the process laid out by Pelosi as an “illegitimate sham from the start”

Meanwhile, Trump branded the process “The Greatest Witch Hunt In American History!” in a tweet.

The resolution puts House Intelligence Committee chair Adam Schiff (D-California) in charge of the impeachment proceedings, while limiting the access of Republican members of Congress and White House attorneys.

It comes following criticism from the GOP that the inquiry launched by Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-California) 37 days ago has not been properly authorized by a full House vote, breaking with precedent established by the previous impeachment campaigns in US history.

In speeches on the House floor on Thursday morning, Democrats and Republicans both invoked the Founding Fathers, the Constitution and the defense of duty and democracy. Democrats maintain that Trump abused his power, undermined US national security and the integrity of elections – citing a July phone call with the president of Ukraine.

Trump and the Republicans have pointed out that none of these things are true, and that there was nothing untoward about the call. The White House has released a transcript of the call, which Schiff famously mischaracterized in a “parody” during a committee hearing. The Democrat-led interrogations of the people involved in US-Ukraine relations have been kept secret, with bits and pieces being leaked to friendly media outlets.

Republicans have called the process an attempt to overturn the 2016 election and influence the 2020 presidential vote, citing a prominent Democrat who said Trump must be impeached or else he will win re-election.

No US president has ever been successfully impeached. Richard Nixon resigned before an impeachment vote. Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton were impeached in the House but not in the Senate, remaining in office as the result.

Source: https://www.rt.com/usa/472314-trump-impeachment-inquiry-vote/

The House Speaker lied to the American public saying the process being voted on today — also called the Schiff Empowerment Act — gives Republicans and the White House the equal power as the crooked Democrats and their leader Adam Schiff in this sham impeachment process.

As Byron York reported earlier today at the Washington Examiner:

The resolution gives Rep. Schiff, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, far-reaching power over the Trump impeachment. Speaker Nancy Pelosi remains the ultimate authority, of course, but, like a chairman of the board choosing a chief executive officer, she has picked Schiff to run the show. And in the resolution, Democrats will give him near-total control…

…The resolution also gives Schiff total control over whether transcripts of depositions already completed and those yet to be done will be made public. “The chair is authorized to make publicly available in electronic form the transcripts of depositions conducted by the [Intelligence Committee] in furtherance of the investigation,” says the resolution. That means Schiff can release transcripts, but it does not mean he must release transcripts.

“It says they are authorized to disclose depositions,” Meadows noted, “which means they can pick and choose which depositions they will release.” Perhaps Schiff will release them all. But he doesn’t have to.

The resolution would also give Schiff the authority to call and conduct public hearings on impeachment. Schiff will control the witnesses. Although there has been some discussion about whether Republicans will have the right to call witnesses, the resolution only gives the ranking Republican on the Intelligence Community, Rep. Devin Nunes, the right to ask Schiff to call a witness.

Rep. Debbie Lesko (R-AZ) went point-by-point highlighting the absurdity of the Democrat Party’s impeachment resolution that gave all power to leaker-liar Adam Schiff.

According to Roll Call, a provision in the resolution gives Democrats the ability to block key witnesses requested by the White House as the process moves to the House Judiciary Committee, led by chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY). Roll Call explains:

The provision gives Nadler broad discretion to punish Trump for stonewalling any aspect of Democrats’ impeachment investigation, not just allegations Trump withheld U.S. military aid from Ukraine to pressure the country to investigate his political rivals that are the primary focus of the inquiry.

If Trump doesn’t turn over his tax returns to the Ways and Means Committee or his financial records to the Financial Services panel — requests he and his counsel are currently fighting in court — Nadler can use his discretion to deny him and his counsel access to the impeachment proceedings.

In addition, while chairman Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) can reject witnesses proposed by the Republican minority, the ranking member of the minority cannot challenge witnesses called by the chair. Though the minority can appeal the chair’s decision to a vote by the whole committee, the Democratic majority virtually guarantees that Schiff’s veto would be upheld.

Sources: BreitbartNews

Related articles Following the Impeachment Inquiry Hearing Sham:

11/1/2019:

AG Bill Barr Flames ‘Unremitting Assault’ On Religion, Traditional Values During Notre Dame Visit

U.S. Attorney General William Barr spoke at Notre Dame Law School on Friday evening, calling for a defense of Judeo-Christian values and religious freedom in response to growing secularism in America.

The event was reserved for students, faculty and staff of the Notre Dame Law School and de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture, both of which hosted the lecture. It took place in the McCartan Courtroom while another room in the law school streamed the speech to another crowd of ticket-holding students and faculty.

Barr began by discussing the new challenges the United States is facing today. It’s a difficulty he said the Founding Fathers foresaw as “the supreme test of a free society.”

“The central question was whether over the long haul, we the people can handle freedom,” Barr said. “The question was whether the citizens in such a free society could maintain the moral discipline and virtue necessary for the survival of free institutions.”

In the Founders’ view, Barr said, free government was only suitable for people who had the discipline to control themselves according to a transcendent moral order. As John Adams put it, he said, the United States Constitution was made only for “a moral and religious people.”

“Now, modern secularists dismiss this idea of morality as sort of otherworldly superstition imposed by a killjoy clergy,” Barr said. “But in fact, Judeo-Christian moral standards are the ultimate utilitarian rules for human conduct. They reflect the rules that are best for man not in the by-and-by but in the here-and-now.”

By the same token, he said, violations of these moral laws have “bad, real world consequences” for man and society — such as society is seeing today.

“I think we all recognize that over the past 50 years, religion has been under increasing attack,” Barr said. “On the one hand, we have seen the steady erosion of our traditional Judeo-Christian moral system and a comprehensive effort to drive it from the public square. On the other hand, we see the growing ascendancy of secularism and the doctrine of moral relativism.”

With escalating suicide rates, the drug epidemic, hate crimes and more, there is a campaign to “destroy the traditional moral order,” Barr said, and secularists ignore these results and press on with “even greater militancy.”

“Among the militant secularists are many so-called progressives,” he said. “But where is the progress? We were told we are living in a post-Christian era. But what has replaced the Judeo-Christian moral system? What is it that can fill the spiritual void in the hearts of the individual person? And what is the system of values that can sustain human social life?”

There used to be a self-healing mechanism that would get things back on course if they go too far in society, Barr said. That may not be the case today, he argued, due to three forces — the first being the “organized destruction” on religion by secularists and their allies.

“One of the ironies, as some have observed, is that the secular project has itself become a religion pursued with religious fervor,” he said. “It is taking out all the trappings of religion, including inquisitions and excommunication. Those who defy the creed risk a figurative burning at the stake: social, educational and professional ostracism and exclusion waged through lawsuits and savage social media campaigns.”

Secondly, instead of addressing underlying causes of moral chaos today, Barr said society has now cast the state as the alleviator of bad consequences.

“So the reaction to growing illegitimacy is not sexual responsibility, but abortion,” he said. “The reaction to drug addiction is safe injection sites. The solution to the breakdown of the family is for the state to set itself up as an ersatz husband for the single mother and an ersatz father for the children. The call comes for more and more social programs to deal with this wreckage — and while we think we’re solving problems, we are underwriting them.”

The third phenomenon he noted is the law being used to break down traditional moral values, and to force religious people and entities to subscribe to practices antithetical to their faith.

“The problem is not that religion is being forced on others, the problem is that irreligion is being forced — secular values are being forced on people of faith,” he said.

Because the Trump administration “firmly supports” accommodation of religion, Barr said, this battleground has largely shifted to the states.

“Ground zero for these attacks on religion are the schools, and to me this is the most serious challenge to religious liberty today,” he said.

There are three fronts for the battle being waged in schools, he said. First is the public school curriculum, with states adopting curriculum incompatible with Judeo-Christian principles. He used New Jersey’s passing of a law requiring public schools to adopt LGBT curriculum as an example.

“This puts parents who descend from the secular orthodoxy to a difficult choice: try to scrape together enough money to send their kids to private school or homeschooling, or allow their children to be inculcated with messages that they fundamentally reject,” Barr said.

The second axis of attack involves states enacting policies “designed to starve religious schools” of funds, he said, encouraging students to choose secular options for schooling.

The third assault on religious freedom in schools, Barr asserted, includes efforts to force religious schools to adhere to secular orthodoxy through state laws.

If these measures are successful, those with religious convictions will become more marginalized, Barr said.

“We cannot sit back and just hope that the pendulum is going to swing back towards sanity,” he said. “As Catholics, we are committed to the Judeo-Christian values that have made this country great, and we know that the first thing we have to do to promote this renewal is to ensure that we are putting our principles into practice in our own personal lives.”

Barr emphasized the importance of the “moral education” of children today.

“We cannot have a moral Renaissance unless we succeed in passing to the next generation our faith and values in full vigor,” he said. “ … If ever there was a need for a resurgence of Catholic education, and more generally religiously affiliated schools, it is today.”

Barr closed his lecture by calling for vigilance in resisting efforts by secularists to “drive religious viewpoints from the public square.”

“I can assure you that as long as I am Attorney General, the Department of Justice will be at the forefront of this effort, ready to fight for the most cherished of all American liberties: the freedom to live according to our faith,” he said.

His lecture was followed by a Q&A session, which was closed to the press.

A recording obtained by The Observer, however, shows Barr fielded questions about the difference between working as Attorney General for President Donald Trump than under former president George H.W. Bush. He also discussed the digital age, hate in America, bipartisan support behind examining big tech companies and his views on immigration.

Along with more polarization today, Barr said things “on the outside” move faster with technology and things “on the inside” are moving slower as compared to his experience under Bush.

“Why things move more slowly in the department, I’m not sure, I’m trying to figure that out,” Barr said. “But I think part of it is of course the environment, people are more afraid of making difficult decisions and they try to finesse the problem rather than squarely deal with it.”

Barr said a serious problem is the rise of hate crimes in America, with many directed primarily at Jews and Muslims.

“I don’t know as much about the religion of Islam, but generally speaking as an Abrahamic religion, what I said about Judeo-Christianity and the importance of ensuring the ability to freely exercise your religion applies to Muslims in this country,” he said.

Catholic schools today are being discredited for teaching hate, Barr said.

“Traditional religious doctrine is now being defined as hate,” he said. “ … That’s used as a basis for trying to silence teaching of those traditional doctrines and moral precepts.”

On immigration, Barr said the problem he has is the unfairness with allowing people to “stand in line at the front door” while others “break into the back door.”

“One of the major problems [with illegal immigration] is the use of the asylum system, asylum or refugees, that is a system distinctive that is meant to deal with sort of exigent circumstances of someone who’s facing, you know, real harm in their country like persecution, fear of death, that kind of thing,” he said. “It’s for populations that are being persecuted, a way to give them haven for as long as that threat exists. So the whole point of this is to get them out of harm’s way — it is not a means of mass migration.”

Students in attendance at the lecture spoke to The Observer about their reactions to his speech.

Second-year law student Krystal Moczygemba said she had no idea what to expect but was struck by some of Barr’s insight.

“I thought he did a really great job of just presenting a topic area on something that all of us would be interested in,” she said. “ … His insight into the idea of self-governance and how that plays a role in how we view responsibility and moral accountability was I thought very interesting — I thought in a good way.”

Second-year law student Owen Fitzgerald said in an email he thought Barr brushed past the Establishment Clause to form an argument that America was founded as a Christian nation.

“Hearing the United States Attorney General blame ‘militant secularists’ for current American issues such as the drug crisis is as concerning as it is bizarre,” Fitzgerald said. “It should worry anyone who recognizes that the Establishment Clause is meant to keep government officials from acting to favor one religious view over another.”

Even so, Fitzgerald said he respects the law school’s decision to invite Barr.

“Now we know exactly what’s running through Barr’s head when he makes important decisions regarding the government’s role in religious matters,” Fitzgerald said. “I trust that in the future the law school will be as willing to invite someone to speak who believes it is not the government’s role to advocate for religion.”

Source: https://ndsmcobserver.com/2019/10/william-barr-speaks-at-notre-dame-about-militant-forces-of-secularism-religious-liberty-in-america/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cySSyFSaGzg

Ronald Reagan’s Evil Empire Speech: “Freedom Prospers when Religion is Vibrant and the Rule of Law under God is Acknowledged.”

Moderator: Ladies and Gentlemen: The President of the United States, Ronald Reagan. President Reagan: Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. And, Reverend Clergy all, Senator Hawkins, distinguished members of the Florida congressional delegation, and all of you: I can’t tell you how you […]

President Reagan’s Inaugural Address

For the first time, an inauguration ceremony was held on the terrace of the West Front of the Capitol. Chief Justice Warren Burger administered the oath of office to the former broadcaster, screen actor, and Governor of California. In the election of 1980, the Republicans won the White House and a majority in the Senate. On inauguration day, American hostages held by the revolutionary government of Iran were released.

Ronald Reagan’s election to the White House came at a time of great economic and international turmoil for the United States. His first inaugural address on January 20, 1981, highlights many major issues of the day, including rising inflation, unemployment, and the Iran Hostage Crisis, which came to an end just minutes after the speech’s conclusion. Reagan pointed to “economic affliction” as one of the most serious challenges facing the nation, and he asserted a need for the reduction of not just public spending but of the federal government itself: “It is my intention to curb the size and influence of the Federal establishment and to demand recognition of the distinction between the powers granted to the Federal Government and those reserved to the States or to the people. All of us need to be reminded that the Federal Government did not create the States; the States created the Federal Government.”

President Ronald Reagan's Inaugural Address (Jan 20, 1981)

Senator Hatfield, Mr. Chief Justice, Mr. President, Vice President Bush, Vice President Mondale, Senator Baker, Speaker O’Neill, Reverend Moomaw, and my fellow citizens:

To a few of us here today, this is a solemn and most momentous occasion; and yet, in the history of our Nation, it is a commonplace occurrence. The orderly transfer of authority as called for in the Constitution routinely takes place as it has for almost two centuries and few of us stop to think how unique we really are. In the eyes of many in the world, this every-4-year ceremony we accept as normal is nothing less than a miracle.

Mr. President, I want our fellow citizens to know how much you did to carry on this tradition. By your gracious cooperation in the transition process, you have shown a watching world that we are a united people pledged to maintaining a political system which guarantees individual liberty to a greater degree than any other, and I thank you and your people for all your help in maintaining the continuity which is the bulwark of our Republic.

The business of our nation goes forward. These United States are confronted with an economic affliction of great proportions. We suffer from the longest and one of the worst sustained inflations in our national history. It distorts our economic decisions, penalizes thrift, and crushes the struggling young and the fixed- income elderly alike. It threatens to shatter the lives of millions of our people.

Idle industries have cast workers into unemployment, causing human misery and personal indignity. Those who do work are denied a fair return for their labor by a tax system which penalizes successful achievement and keeps us from maintaining full productivity.

But great as our tax burden is, it has not kept pace with public spending. For decades, we have piled deficit upon deficit, mortgaging our future and our children’s future for the temporary convenience of the present. To continue this long trend is to guarantee tremendous social, cultural, political, and economic upheavals.

You and I, as individuals, can, by borrowing, live beyond our means, but for only a limited period of time. Why, then, should we think that collectively, as a nation, we are not bound by that same limitation?

We must act today in order to preserve tomorrow. And let there be no misunderstanding–we are going to begin to act, beginning today.

The economic ills we suffer have come upon us over several decades. They will not go away in days, weeks, or months, but they will go away. They will go away because we, as Americans, have the capacity now, as we have had in the past, to do whatever needs to be done to preserve this last and greatest bastion of freedom.

In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.

From time to time, we have been tempted to believe that society has become too complex to be managed by self-rule, that government by an elite group is superior to government for, by, and of the people. But if no one among us is capable of governing himself, then who among us has the capacity to govern someone else? All of us together, in and out of government, must bear the burden. The solutions we seek must be equitable, with no one group singled out to pay a higher price.

We hear much of special interest groups. Our concern must be for a special interest group that has been too long neglected. It knows no sectional boundaries or ethnic and racial divisions, and it crosses political party lines. It is made up of men and women who raise our food, patrol our streets, man our mines and our factories, teach our children, keep our homes, and heal us when we are sick–professionals, industrialists, shopkeepers, clerks, cabbies, and truck drivers. They are, in short, “We the people,” this breed called Americans.

Well, this administration’s objective will be a healthy, vigorous, growing economy that provides equal opportunity for all Americans, with no barriers born of bigotry or discrimination. Putting America back to work means putting all Americans back to work. Ending inflation means freeing all Americans from the terror of runaway living costs. All must share in the productive work of this “new beginning” and all must share in the bounty of a revived economy. With the idealism and fair play which are the core of our system and our strength, we can have a strong and prosperous America at peace with itself and the world.

So, as we begin, let us take inventory. We are a nation that has a government–not the other way around. And this makes us special among the nations of the Earth. Our Government has no power except that granted it by the people. It is time to check and reverse the growth of government which shows signs of having grown beyond the consent of the governed.

It is my intention to curb the size and influence of the Federal establishment and to demand recognition of the distinction between the powers granted to the Federal Government and those reserved to the States or to the people. All of us need to be reminded that the Federal Government did not create the States; the States created the Federal Government.

Now, so there will be no misunderstanding, it is not my intention to do away with government. It is, rather, to make it work-work with us, not over us; to stand by our side, not ride on our back. Government can and must provide opportunity, not smother it; foster productivity, not stifle it.

If we look to the answer as to why, for so many years, we achieved so much, prospered as no other people on Earth, it was because here, in this land, we unleashed the energy and individual genius of man to a greater extent than has ever been done before. Freedom and the dignity of the individual have been more available and assured here than in any other place on Earth. The price for this freedom at times has been high, but we have never been unwilling to pay that price.

It is no coincidence that our present troubles parallel and are proportionate to the intervention and intrusion in our lives that result from unnecessary and excessive growth of government. It is time for us to realize that we are too great a nation to limit ourselves to small dreams. We are not, as some would have us believe, loomed to an inevitable decline. I do not believe in a fate that will all on us no matter what we do. I do believe in a fate that will fall on us if we do nothing. So, with all the creative energy at our command, let us begin an era of national renewal. Let us renew our determination, our courage, and our strength. And let us renew; our faith and our hope.

We have every right to dream heroic dreams. Those who say that we are in a time when there are no heroes just don’t know where to look. You can see heroes every day going in and out of factory gates. Others, a handful in number, produce enough food to feed all of us and then the world beyond. You meet heroes across a counter–and they are on both sides of that counter. There are entrepreneurs with faith in themselves and faith in an idea who create new jobs, new wealth and opportunity. They are individuals and families whose taxes support the Government and whose voluntary gifts support church, charity, culture, art, and education. Their patriotism is quiet but deep. Their values sustain our national life.

I have used the words “they” and “their” in speaking of these heroes. I could say “you” and “your” because I am addressing the heroes of whom I speak–you, the citizens of this blessed land. Your dreams, your hopes, your goals are going to be the dreams, the hopes, and the goals of this administration, so help me God.

We shall reflect the compassion that is so much a part of your makeup. How can we love our country and not love our countrymen, and loving them, reach out a hand when they fall, heal them when they are sick, and provide opportunities to make them self- sufficient so they will be equal in fact and not just in theory?

Can we solve the problems confronting us? Well, the answer is an unequivocal and emphatic “yes.” To paraphrase Winston Churchill, I did not take the oath I have just taken with the intention of presiding over the dissolution of the world’s strongest economy.

In the days ahead I will propose removing the roadblocks that have slowed our economy and reduced productivity. Steps will be taken aimed at restoring the balance between the various levels of government. Progress may be slow–measured in inches and feet, not miles–but we will progress. Is it time to reawaken this industrial giant, to get government back within its means, and to lighten our punitive tax burden. And these will be our first priorities, and on these principles, there will be no compromise.

On the eve of our struggle for independence a man who might have been one of the greatest among the Founding Fathers, Dr. Joseph Warren, President of the Massachusetts Congress, said to his fellow Americans, “Our country is in danger, but not to be despaired of…. On you depend the fortunes of America. You are to decide the important questions upon which rests the happiness and the liberty of millions yet unborn. Act worthy of yourselves.”

Well, I believe we, the Americans of today, are ready to act worthy of ourselves, ready to do what must be done to ensure happiness and liberty for ourselves, our children and our children’s children.

And as we renew ourselves here in our own land, we will be seen as having greater strength throughout the world. We will again be the exemplar of freedom and a beacon of hope for those who do not now have freedom.

To those neighbors and allies who share our freedom, we will strengthen our historic ties and assure them of our support and firm commitment. We will match loyalty with loyalty. We will strive for mutually beneficial relations. We will not use our friendship to impose on their sovereignty, for or own sovereignty is not for sale.

As for the enemies of freedom, those who are potential adversaries, they will be reminded that peace is the highest aspiration of the American people. We will negotiate for it, sacrifice for it; we will not surrender for it–now or ever.

Our forbearance should never be misunderstood. Our reluctance for conflict should not be misjudged as a failure of will. When action is required to preserve our national security, we will act. We will maintain sufficient strength to prevail if need be, knowing that if we do so we have the best chance of never having to use that strength.

Above all, we must realize that no arsenal, or no weapon in the arsenals of the world, is so formidable as the will and moral courage of free men and women. It is a weapon our adversaries in today’s world do not have. It is a weapon that we as Americans do have. Let that be understood by those who practice terrorism and prey upon their neighbors.

I am told that tens of thousands of prayer meetings are being held on this day, and for that I am deeply grateful. We are a nation under God, and I believe God intended for us to be free. It would be fitting and good, I think, if on each Inauguration Day in future years it should be declared a day of prayer.

This is the first time in history that this ceremony has been held, as you have been told, on this West Front of the Capitol. Standing here, one faces a magnificent vista, opening up on this city’s special beauty and history. At the end of this open mall are those shrines to the giants on whose shoulders we stand.

Directly in front of me, the monument to a monumental man: George Washington, Father of our country. A man of humility who came to greatness reluctantly. He led America out of revolutionary victory into infant nationhood. Off to one side, the stately memorial to Thomas Jefferson. The Declaration of Independence flames with his eloquence.

And then beyond the Reflecting Pool the dignified columns of the Lincoln Memorial. Whoever would understand in his heart the meaning of America will find it in the life of Abraham Lincoln.

Beyond those monuments to heroism is the Potomac River, and on the far shore the sloping hills of Arlington National Cemetery with its row on row of simple white markers bearing crosses or Stars of David. They add up to only a tiny fraction of the price that has been paid for our freedom.

Each one of those markers is a monument to the kinds of hero I spoke of earlier. Their lives ended in places called Belleau Wood, The Argonne, Omaha Beach, Salerno and halfway around the world on Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Pork Chop Hill, the Chosin Reservoir, and in a hundred rice paddies and jungles of a place called Vietnam.

Under one such marker lies a young man, Martin Treptow, who left his job in a small town barber shop in 1917 to go to France with the famed Rainbow Division. There, on the western front, he was killed trying to carry a message between battalions under heavy artillery fire.

We are told that on his body was found a diary. On the flyleaf under the heading, “My Pledge,” he had written these words: “America must win this war. Therefore, I will work, I will save, I will sacrifice, I will endure, I will fight cheerfully and do my utmost, as if the issue of the whole struggle depended on me alone.”

The crisis we are facing today does not require of us the kind of sacrifice that Martin Treptow and so many thousands of others were called upon to make. It does require, however, our best effort, and our willingness to believe in ourselves and to believe in our capacity to perform great deeds; to believe that together, with God’s help, we can and will resolve the problems which now confront us.

And, after all, why shouldn’t we believe that? We are Americans.

God bless you, and thank you.

During a video presentation on Memorial Day 2019 at the game of the Fresno Grizzlies, a minor league baseball team in California, a clip of President Ronald Reagan’s first inaugural address was played atop of patriotic pictures honoring America’s veterans.

“As for the enemies of freedom, those who are potential adversaries, they will be reminded that peace is the highest aspiration of the American people,” Reagan said.