Study: High Fructose Intake May Drive Aggressive Behaviors, ADHD, More

Diets high in sugar may increase a person’s risk for developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder and aggressive behaviors, according to a report published Friday by the journal Evolution and Human Behavior.

Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus suggest that fructose, a component of sugar and high-fructose corn syrup, and uric acid, a fructose metabolite, may work to bring about the onset of these disorders in those genetically predisposed to them.

By lowering energy in cells, fructose “triggers a foraging response similar to what occurs in starvation,” which effectively stimulates behaviors such as risk taking, impulsivity, rapid decision making and aggressiveness, the researchers said.

This foraging response shares similarities with behavioral disorders such as ADHD, as well as bipolar disorder and aggressive behavior, they said.

“There have been many reports suggesting that sugar or other added sweeteners such as high-fructose corn syrup may be able to cause or aggravate various behavioral disorders,” study co-author Dr. Richard Johnson told UPI.

“The evidence is based on the unique ability of fructose to lower energy that triggers a foraging type of response,” said Johnson, a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

The theory is based on “an evolutionary-based survival pathway” used by animals to protect against starvation, according to Johnson and his colleagues.

Historically, animals and humans used this response for survival, understanding that they needed to take certain risks to obtain food and avoid starvation and death, the researchers said.

However, this survival pathway is now activated by the metabolism of fructose, leading to the storage of fat in the liver and blood, the development of insulin resistance and a decrease in energy expenditure, earlier research by Johnson and his colleagues suggested.

The introduction of refined sugar and high-fructose corn syrup into the human diet has led to a significant increase in fructose intake over the past 300 to 400 years, and Johnson and his colleagues argue that this level of intake is higher “than nature intended.”

In addition to fueling epidemics in obesity and diabetes, high-fructose intake can lead to problem behaviors, as human cells seek to restore their lost energy.

The new report describes how high amounts of fructose found in refined sugars in the typical Western diet may contribute to the development of behavioral disorders.

Sugar does not cause these behaviors, however, as it’s just a contributing factor, researchers emphasized.

“The identification of fructose as a risk factor does not negate the importance of genetic, familial, physical, emotional and environmental factors that shape mental health,” Johnson said.

Conditions such as ADHD and bipolar disorder are genetic — meaning they’re passed from parent to child — but they also have some “environmental components,” according to Dr. L. Eugene Arnold, emeritus professor of psychiatry at Ohio State University.

“Physical and mental health … impact each other,” said Arnold, a resident expert with Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, or CHADD, an education and advocacy organization for people with the condition and their caregivers.

Currently, CHADD doesn’t offer guidance with regard to diet. However, the organization does cite research noting links between sugar intake and the worsening of ADHD symptoms.

With that in mind, Arnold recommends a diet built around “natural, whole foods,” such as the Mediterranean diet.

“A rule of thumb is if the list of ingredients on a food product label is so long you don’t want to read it, don’t buy it,” he said.

More research is needed to investigate the role of sugar and uric acid on mental health, especially with drugs designed to inhibit fructose metabolism for the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome on the horizon, Johnson said.

For now, “reducing intake of sugar and high-fructose corn syrup, especially sugary beverages, may be of additional benefit in preventing or helping behavioral disorders such as ADHD and bipolar disorder,” he said.

Google Scrubs Search Results Clean of Natural Health Sites and Begins Manipulating Autocomplete Function to Steer Users from Natural Health

On June 3rd, 2019, it was discovered that Google had scrubbed their search results clean of natural health sites (such as Mercola.com), resulting in some losing as much as 99% of their traffic. Soon after, it was discovered that Google also manipulates users with their autocomplete function into thinking that natural approaches to health are fraudulent and even harmful.

Google manipulates your search results in a very specific way. For instance, if you start your search out with “supplements are,” Google will autocomplete your search field with the following suggestions:

“SUPPLEMENTS ARE BAD, USELESS, NOT REGULATED, DANGEORUS, SCAMS”

Google is now censoring all content about organics, homeopathy, naturopathy, chiropractic, herbs, nutrition and supplements.

Sayer Ji, founder of GreenMedInfo, has put together a damning collecting of evidence proving that Google is maliciously altering search suggestions to try to destroy natural health and naturopathy. It’s all part of Google’s total collapse into pure evil that has also seen Google censoring all conservative, Christian or pro-Trump content.

Make no mistake: Google is pro-pharma, pro-Monsanto, pro-glyphosate, pro-pesticides, pro-chemotherapy, pro-fluoride, pro-5G, pro-geoengineering and fully supports every other toxic poison that endangers humankind.

Google is poison to humanity. (See EvilGoogle.news for more daily reporting.)

Here’s the report from GreenMedInfo, entitled, “GOOGLE: ‘Organic is a Lie, Supplements are Dangerous, Chiropractic is Fake,’ and Other Thoughts They Want You To Think.”

Most Google users believe that its suggestions reflect the volume of searches others are doing on the topic — a reasonable assumption, given Google says their algorithm is “Based on several factors, like how often others have searched for a term.” In fact, Google goes out of their way to say they are not making subjective suggestions, but objective predictions based on real searches:

“Predictions, not suggestions – You’ll notice we call these autocomplete “predictions” rather than “suggestions,” and there’s a good reason for that. Autocomplete is designed to help people complete a search they were intending to do, not to suggest new types of searches to be performed. These are our best predictions of the query you were likely to continue entering.

How do we determine these predictions? We look at the real searches that happen on Google and show common and trending ones relevant to the characters that are entered and also related to your location and previous searches.” Source: Google

But Google Trends data show the “supplements are” autocomplete results above to be inaccurate, if not blatantly falsified. In fact, keyword search volume trend lines show that since 2004, searches for the phrase “supplements are bad” relative to “supplements are good” (in red) are far lower, and the gap continues to increase, with about 5x more people searching for them in a positive rather than negative light. This is the very definition of the Orwellian inversion: where Good becomes Bad, and War becomes Peace. 

Amazing, a third Google product from its extremely profitable Google Ads division called Keyword Planner, shows an even more accurate quantification of how many searches have actually been performed in the United States in the past month with the phrase: “supplements are bad.” The result? Only 100-1,000 searches, which is between only .2739 and 2.7 people a day.

That’s right, in the entire population of the United States (327,321,076 as of March, 26, 2018), at most 2.7 people type the phrase “supplements are bad” into the Google search engine. But if any of those 327 million people type “supplements are…” into the Google search engine, all 327 million users will have their search completed for them with the suggestion that they are “bad” and search for information on how bad they are.

In order to demonstrate that this result is not a fluke, let’s look at the search “taking vitamins…” and see what Google suggests in their autocomplete.

And what does the Google Trend data show? A null result: “Hmm, your search doesn’t have enough data to show here.”

This should not be surprising considering that the vast majority use search engines to field queries and not affirmative statements reflecting foregone conclusions. But that’s how thoroughly a very specific anti-nutritional industry political agenda is embedded within Google’s algorithm.

When we drop this phrase into Google’s keyword planner, what do we get? An astounding 0-10 people search this term every month in the U.S. In other words, no one.

We discussed the potential corrupting influence of pharmaceutical companies, with whom Google partners and receives investment, on their results in our previous article: INVESTIGATION: Google Manipulates Search Suggestions To Promote Pharma, Discredit Natural Health.

Alternative browsers like Duckduckgo, on the other hand, won’t suggest anything because it does not have an autocomplete function as google does, which google states: “is designed to help people complete a search they were intending to do, not to suggest new types of searches to be performed.

Our investigation has uncovered a number of examples like this where Google is placing autocomplete suggestions into the search user’s mind that are not only the opposite of what most people search for, but sometimes do not search for at all — indicating that Google’s ostensibly objective feature is literally a propaganda device programming users to think thoughts they would never otherwise consider.

This has profound implications, as we will explore later, as the so-called Search Engine Manipulation Effect (SEME) identified by researchers in 2013, is one of the most powerfully influential forces on human behavior ever discovered — so powerful, in fact, that it may have determined the outcome of one quarter of the world’s elections in recent years.

But first, let’s look at further examples of Google’s dystopian search results, such as:

Sources:

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