Netherlands Refuses to Mandate Face Masks; Sweden Says they are ‘Pointless’

The Netherlands has decided not to mandate the wearing of face masks in public, citing the fact that there is no scientific evidence to suggest they are effective against the spread of the coronavirus.

“From a medical perspective there is no proven effectiveness of masks, the Cabinet has decided that there will be no national obligation for wearing non-medical masks” announced Netherlands Minister for Medical Care Tamara van Ark.

The country’s National Institute for Health (RIVM) noted that it is aware of studies from other countries that purport to show masks slow the spread of disease, but will not be heeding them.

Indeed, RIVM chief Jaap van Dissel warned that wearing masks incorrectly, in addition to the effect masks have of eroding the perceived need for social distancing, could increase the risk of transmission because of a “false sense of security”.

So we think that if you’re going to use masks (in a public setting) … then you must give good training for it,” he said.

Within the past week in the Netherlands, around 1400 new COVID-19 cases were reported, which equates to 342 more than the week before.

In Sweden, meanwhile, senior epidemiologist Anders Tegnell declared that there is “no point” in wearing masks in public.

“We see no point in wearing a face mask in Sweden, not even on public transport,” Tegnell said.

Sweden, which has not even instituted a lock down at any time, appears to be seeing a downward trend in cases.

At the beginning of this week, Sweden announced just 398 new cases, down from 767 the week before and 2,530 one month ago.

“The curves go down, and the curves over the seriously ill begin to be very close to zero. As a whole, it is very positive,” Tegnell asserted.

Source: Infowars

White Helmets ‘MI-6 Co-Founder’ Found Dead In Turkey

A former British army officer and military contractor who founded the shadowy ‘White Helmets’ has been found dead near his home in Istanbul, days after he was accused by Russia of being a spy with “connections to terrorist groups.”

The body of 43-year-old James Le Mesurier was found Monday in the Beyoglu district of the city, with state-run Anadolu news agency reporting that he may have fallen to his death.

The White Helmets, a roughly 3,000 member NGO formally known as the Syrian Civil Defense, was established in Turkey in “late 2012 – early 2013” Le Mesurier trained an initial group of 20 Syrians. The group then received funding from Le Mesurier’s Netherlands-based non-profit group, Mayday Rescue – which is in turn funded by grants from the Dutch, British, Danish and German governments.

According to reporter and author Max Blumenthal, the White Helmets received at least $55 million from the British Foreign Office and $23 million from the Agency for International Development. They have also received millions from Qatar, which has backed several extremist groups in Syria including Al Qaeda.

The US has provided at least $32 million to the group – around 1/3 of their total funding – through a USAID scheme orchestrated by the Obama State Department and routed overseas using a Washington D.C. contractor participating in USAID’s Syria regional program, Chemonics.

According to their website, the White Helmets have been directly funded by Mayday Rescue, and a company called Chemonics, since 2014.

Yet there’s evidence that both of those organizations started supporting the White Helmets back in early 2013, right around the time the White Helmets claim to have formed as self-organized groups.

Mayday Rescue, as we said, is funded by the Dutch, British, Danish and German governments. And Chemonics?

They are a Washington, D.C. based contractor that was awarded $128.5 million in January 2013 to support “a peaceful transition to a democratic and stable Syria” as part of USAID’s Syria regional program. At least $32 million has been given directly to the White Helmets as of February 2018. –TruthInMedia

Notably, the Trump administration cut US funding to the White Helmets last May, placing them under “active review.”

While the White Helmets tout themselves as ‘first responders’, the group has been accused of staging multiple chemical attacks – including an April 7 incident in Duma, Syria which the White House used as a pretext to bomb Syrian government facilities and bases.

Blumenthal writes, “When Defense Secretary James Mattis cited ‘social media’ in place of scientific evidence of a chemical attack in Duma, he was referring to video shot by members of the White Helmets. Similarly, when State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert sought to explain why the US bombed Syria before inspectors from the OPCW could produce a report from the ground, she claimed, ‘We have our own intelligence.’ With little else to offer, she was likely referring to social media material published by members of the White Helmets.

Days before Mesurier’s death, Russian foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova claimed he was a “former agent of Britain’s MI6, who had been spotted all around the world.”

Weeks after the Douma incident, Russian officials brought fifteen people to The Hague said to have been present, including 11-year-old Hassan Diab who was seen in a widely-distributed White Helmets video receiving “emergency treatment” in a local hospital after the alleged incident.

“We were at the basement and we heard people shouting that we needed to go to a hospital. We went through a tunnel. At the hospital they started pouring cold water on me,” said Diab, who was featured in the video which Russia’s ambassador to the Netherlands says was staged.

Others present during the filming of Diab’s hospital “cleanup” by the White Helmets include hospital administrator Ahmad Kashoi, who runs the emergency ward.

“There were people unknown to us who were filming the emergency care, they were filming the chaos taking place inside, and were filming people being doused with water. The instruments they used to douse them with water were originally used to clean the floors actually,” Ahmad Kashoi, an administrator of the emergency ward, recalled. “That happened for about an hour, we provided help to them and sent them home. No one has died. No one suffered from chemical exposure.” -RT

Also speaking at The Hague was Halil al-Jaish, an emergency worker who treated people at the Douma hospital the day of the attack – who said that while some patients did come in for respiratory problems, they were attributed to heavy dust, present in the air after recent airstrikes, but that nobody showed signs of chemical warfare poisoning.

According to the governor’s office in Istanbul, “comprehensive administrative and judicial investigations” have been initiated into Le Mesurier’s death.

Perhaps he fell after an Assad operative spiked his tea with polonium, affecting his equilibrium. Whatever the case, it wouldn’t surprise us if this becomes a pretext to ‘liberate’ Syria.

Source: ZeroHedge

Eurovision 2019 Finale and the Occult Meaning of Madonna’s Controversial Performance

The Eurovision Song Contest 2019 was the 64th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Tel Aviv, Israel, following Netta’s win at the 2018 contest in Lisbon, Portugal, with the song “Toy”. It was the third time Israel had hosted the contest, having previously done so in 1979 and 1999. However, this was the first time Israel hosted the contest outside of Jerusalem. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Israeli Public Broadcasting Corporation (IPBC), the contest was held at Expo Tel Aviv, and consisted of two semi-finals on 14 and 16 May, and the final on 18 May 2019. The three live shows were hosted by Erez Tal, Bar Refaeli, Assi Azar and Lucy Ayoub.

Forty-one countries took part in the contest; Bulgaria and Ukraine were absent. Bulgaria did not enter because members of its delegation had been moved to other projects. Ukraine had originally planned to participate in the contest but withdrew because of the controversy surrounding their national final.

The winner was the Netherlands with the song “Arcade”, performed by Duncan Laurence who also wrote it with Joel Sjöö, Wouter Hardy and Will Knox. This was the Netherlands’ fifth victory in the contest, following their wins in 1957, 1959, 1969 and 1975. In a similar way to 2016, the overall winner won neither the jury vote, which was won by North Macedonia, nor the televote, which was won by Norway, with the Netherlands placing third and second respectively. Italy, Russia, Switzerland and Sweden rounded out the top five. Further down the table, North Macedonia and San Marino achieved their best results to date, finishing seventh and nineteenth, respectively. This was North Macedonia’s first top 10 finish since joining the competition in 1998. Israel finished in 23rd place in the final, making it the fourth time since 2015 the host country ranked in the bottom five.

There was an error in the voting at the contest: a wrongful counting of the jury votes by the Belarusian delegation caused the televised results to be amended three days later. The discrepancy was not large enough to change the order of the originally announced top four in the final result, which combines the jury voting and televoting by the public, but this update saw North Macedonia as the new jury winner instead of Sweden as shown on TV; there were also minor changes in lower positions. (Wikipedia)

BELOW: A look at the symbolism found throughout the finale of Eurovision 2019 and an analysis of Madonna’s extremely symbolic and controversial performance.

The show is one of the most watched non-sporting events in the world, with an average audience of 300 million viewers. Needless to say, Eurovision has been incredibly influential throughout the decades and has helped launch the careers of countless artists. That being said, is there a chance that the show’s reach could be used by the elite to push its messages and symbolism? You betcha. And the 2019 edition was particularly obvious. Taking place in Israel, the show even culminated with an elaborate yet horrifying performance by the Grand Priestess of the music industry herself: Madonna.

The grand finale of the Eurovision contest culminated with a disturbing and deeply occult performance by Madonna which seems to foretell things to come. After partaking into some kind of occult ritual, a bunch of people wearing gas masks surrounded Madonna.

Madonna wearing a crown (corona) surrounded by people in gas masks.

As Madonna performed the song Future, she sang:

Not everyone is coming to the future
Not everyone is learning from the past
Not everyone can come into the future
Not everyone that’s here is gonna last

Then, Madonna blows a wind of death on the masked people and everybody dies. Also, in the background, the Statue of Liberty is broken. Today, our liberties are broken as well.

Fast-forward to today, Madonna is saying weird things about the virus. In a recent video posted on her social media account, Madonna said this about the pandemic:

“It’s the great equalizer, and what’s terrible about it is what’s great about it. What’s terrible about it is it’s made us all equal in many ways — and what’s wonderful about it is it’s made us all equal in many ways.”

I personally wouldn’t use the word “wonderful” anywhere near this virus. But I’m not an elite-connected psychopath. Speaking of which, Madonna also partnered up with those who want to turn this crisis into an Orwellian nightmare.

 Read the Full Article HERE

Ronald Bernard, a Former Elite Dutch Banker who Facilitated Money Laundering & Tax Avoidance for Elites, Secret Service, Governments, & Terrorist Groups, Becomes a Whistleblower

The Alternative Media have long asserted that an international cabal of satanists controls our world. Now, a credible whistleblower has come forth, testifying to the cabal’s existence. He is a former elite Dutch banker named Ronald Bernard. Below is an interview of Bernard in Dutch, with English subtitles, followed by a transcript. The interview was […]

Report: Higher Cholesterol Is Associated With Longer Life

Is it possible that mainstream medicine got cholesterol all wrong? That not only does cholesterol have no connection to heart disease, but that high cholesterol is actually a good thing? Yes, it’s more than possible — here I’ll show some evidence that higher cholesterol is associated with longer life.

All-cause mortality vs heart disease

Obviously, people die from many causes, whether natural, such as heart disease, cancer, or infection, or unnatural, such as from homicide, suicide, or accidents.

Should we be concerned about what cause we die from?

Yes, and no. On the one hand, if you’re dead, you’re dead, no matter from what. On the other, dying in your sleep in old age may be preferable to a long, lingering illness.

Nevertheless, from a public health standpoint, it seems a mistake to focus on changing something that lowers the risk of death from one cause only to raise that risk from another.

While total cholesterol is a poor if not utterly worthless risk marker for heart disease, doctors have focused on it to the exclusion of how it might affect other causes of death. It does you little good to save yourself from heart disease if it means that you increase your risk of death from cancer.

All-cause mortality — death from anything — is the most appropriate measure to use when looking at risk factors.

Older people with higher cholesterol live longer

Population studies in Japan show that people of all ages with higher cholesterol live longer.1

Overall, an inverse trend is found [in Japan] between all-cause mortality and total (or low density lipoprotein [LDL]) cholesterol levels: mortality is highest in the lowest cholesterol group without exception. If limited to elderly people, this trend is universal. As discussed in Section 2, elderly people with the highest cholesterol levels have the highest survival rates irrespective of where they live in the world.

Consider the chart above, taken from the paper. It shows all-cause mortality by cholesterol levels, men on the left, women on the right.

Current guidelines call for keeping cholesterol at 200 mg/dl or lower, yet higher levels meant lower death rates.

What about outside Japan? The following chart shows cumulative all-cause mortality of people older than 85 in Leiden, The Netherlands, by cholesterol level.

The cohort with an average cholesterol of 252 mg/dl, the highest, had the lowest death rates.

The following shows data from elderly people in Finland. Those with cholesterol greater than 232 mg/dl had the lowest death rates.

The data from Japan is for all ages; the data from outside Japan is for the elderly. What about the data for all ages, outside of Japan? The authors believe that the presence of people with familial hypercholesterolemia, which causes a very high cholesterol level and which raises the risk of death, in the highest cholesterol categories, accounts for higher death rates in those categories. They also argue that cholesterol levels in that disorder are not the cause of increased death rates.

A recent review in the prominent medical journal BMJ regarding LDL cholesterol, the risk marker considered most significant, found either no association or an inverse association between LDL and death rates.2

High LDL-C is inversely associated with mortality in most people over 60 years. This finding is inconsistent with the cholesterol hypothesis (ie, that cholesterol, particularly LDL-C, is inherently atherogenic). Since elderly people with high LDL-C live as long or longer than those with low LDL-C, our analysis provides reason to question the validity of the cholesterol hypothesis. Moreover, our study provides the rationale for a re-evaluation of guidelines recommending pharmacological reduction of LDL-C in the elderly as a component of cardiovascular disease prevention strategies.

The Honolulu Heart Program was one of the first studies to find this inverse relation between total cholesterol and death rates in elderly people, aged 71 to 93. It found that compared to the lowest quartile (fourth) of cholesterol level, increasing quartiles of cholesterol had cholesterol had 28%, 40%, and 35% decreased death rates, respectively.

Furthermore, the Honolulu study seems to provide evidence that actually raising cholesterol is protective, since “Only the group with low cholesterol concentration at both examinations had a significant association with mortality.”

The authors of the study concluded, “We have been unable to explain our results. These data cast doubt on the scientific justification for lowering cholesterol to very low concentrations (<4.65 mmol/L) [<180 mg/dl] in elderly people.”

Is high cholesterol protective?

Why would people with low cholesterol die at higher rates than those with higher cholesterol?

Several things could be going on.

Cholesterol may protect against infections and atherosclerosis.3

Cholesterol may protect against cancer.4

A strong association was found between low cholesterol and violence. Odds ratio of violence for cholesterol of <180 mg/dl was 15.49. 5

Several studies have found an association between low cholesterol and suicide. For instance, one study found that those in the lowest quartile (fourth) of cholesterol concentration had more than 6 times the risk of suicide as those in the highest quartile.6

Conclusion

A number of studies have found that, at least in people older than 60, high cholesterol is associated with lower death rates.

This fact casts considerable doubt on the cholesterol hypothesis of heart disease.

Why, with so much evidence against it, does the cholesterol theory still have so much traction? To quote the authors in the first cited study, it’s all about the money:

We believe the answer is very simple: for the side defending this so-called cholesterol theory, the amount of money at stake is too much to lose the fight.

Update: I hadn’t seen this before I wrote this article, but Uffe Ravnskov, a co-author of some of the above-cited studies, has a good article with many relevant citations, The Benefits of High Cholesterol.

  1. Ann Nutr Metab 2015;66(suppl 4):1–116 DOI: 10.1159/000381654
  2. Ravnskov, Uffe, et al. “Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review.” BMJ open 6.6 (2016): e010401.
  3. Ravnskov, Uffe. “High cholesterol may protect against infections and atherosclerosis.” Qjm96.12 (2003): 927–934.
  4. Ravnskov, U., K. S. McCully, and P. J. Rosch. “The statin-low cholesterol-cancer conundrum.”QJM (2011): hcr243.
  5. Mufti, Rizwan M., Richard Balon, and Cynthia L. Arfken. “Low cholesterol and violence.”Psychiatric services (2006).
  6. Ellison, Larry F., and Howard I. Morrison. “Low serum cholesterol concentration and risk of suicide.” Epidemiology 12.2 (2001): 168–172.

Source: Medium