Watching TV makes us prefer thinner women

The more TV we watch the more we prefer thinner female bodies, according to a new comprehensive study on body image.

The researchers are calling on TV and advertising bosses to show people of all shapes and sizes in order to reduce the pressure on women and girls to aspire to a ‘thin ideal body’.

The team, led by Durham University, worked with men and women from a number of villages in a remote area of Nicaragua in Central America who either had regular or hardly any TV access.

People with very limited access to TV preferred female figures with a higher Body Mass Index (BMI) whereas people who often watched TV preferred thinner bodies.

The villages in Nicaragua were selected because people were very similar in terms of their ecological constraints, such as nutrition, income and education, but had differing access to TV. This meant researchers were able to isolate the effect of TV exposure from the other factors.

The researchers say this is the best evidence to date that TV is having a causal effect on people’s perceptions of body ideals.

The findings, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, show that TV exposure can have a powerful impact on what people perceive as the ideal body.

The representation of this ‘thin ideal’ in the media can lead to body dissatisfaction and can play a part in the development of eating disorders and depression.

Lead author of the research, Professor Lynda Boothroyd, from Durham University’s Psychology Department, said: “TV and advertising bosses have a moral responsibility to use actors, presenters and models of all shapes and sizes and avoid stigmatising larger bodies. There needs to be a shift towards a ‘health at every size’ attitude and the media has an important role to play in that.”

People in the villages in this part of Nicaragua generally did not have access to magazines or the Internet, and none of the participants in the study owned a smartphone. Only those people with electricity supplies to their homes as well as the money to pay for a TV and subscription were able to watch TV on a regular basis.

Those people with access to TV watched a mixture of Latin soap operas, Hollywood action movies, music videos, police “car chase” reality shows and the news.

Co-author, Dr Jean-Luc Jucker, from Durham University and University of the Autonomous Regions of the Nicaraguan Caribbean Coast, commented: “This study, utilizing a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods with non-Western participants, provides yet more empirical evidence that the mass media impact female body size ideals.”

299 men and women from seven villages in the Pearl Lagoon Basin area of Nicaragua took part in the research. They completed a questionnaire about their ethnicity, education, income, hunger, language and TV exposure. They were then asked to rate the attractiveness of pictures of female bodies with varying body shapes and sizes.

In addition to this study, the team also carried out another study among those villagers who had little or no TV access. Dr Tracey Thornborrow from the University of Lincoln, co-author and field researcher on the project, explains: “We showed the villagers a series of pictures, either showing larger women or thinner women. We found that after viewing these images, the villagers’ body ideals adjusted in the same direction.

“Our findings clearly demonstrate that perceptions of attractiveness are highly changeable, and are affected by what we are visually exposed to.”

Professor Boothroyd has previously found the same effect in women in Western societies but this effect had never been tested outside industrialised societies before.

Being able to show that perceptions of attractiveness are this changeable in even ‘media naïve’ participants is a major step forward in our understanding of cultural variation, according to the researchers. “If there’s something that’s universal about attraction, it is how flexible it is,” Professor Boothroyd added.

The research was conducted with colleagues from the University of the Autonomous Regions of the Nicaraguan Caribbean Coast, University of Lincoln, Newcastle University and University of East London. It was funded by the Leverhulme Trust.

UK Survey: The Average Person Will Watch More Than 78,000 Hrs of TV

Television has become such a common part of all of our lives that most don’t even think about just how much time they spend staring at their TV screen. Of course, all of those hours are undoubtedly adding up, and a recent survey of 2,000 British adults finds that the average TV viewer will watch an astounding 78,705 hours of programming (movies, sports, news, etc) in their lifetime. That’s a whole lot of screen time that may have been better spent on more productive endeavors.

On a day-to-day basis, the average adult watches TV for three-and-a-half hours, amounting to 1,248 hours each year.

The survey, commissioned by LG Electronics, broke down those numbers even further and concluded that the average adult these days will watch 3,639 movies at home, and 31,507 episodes of TV during their lifespan. As far as different programs, the average person will watch 11,278 different TV series as well.

Additionally, it seems that deciding what to watch is a very common problem among modern families. The average household will have two arguments every week simply over what to watch. Sadly, more than half of the survey’s participants say their household would struggle to get by with only one television for everyone.

That’s probably why, according to the research, the average home hosts at least two TV sets, which are usually thrown out in favor of newer models every six years.

When it comes to watching TV, modern audiences have made it clear that quality matters. A full quarter of respondents say their viewing experience can easily be ruined by an outdated TV, which is why many usually go out to friends’ homes or bars to watch big events.

Here’s an especially noteworthy statistic: six in ten respondents actually admit they would be lost without their TV set.

So, besides screen quality, what else annoys people most often while watching TV? Sound quality and glares on the screen were the most frequently listed annoyances by respondents. Other common annoyances included other people talking while a show is on, and others asking annoying questions while a program is on.

Between traditional cable, smart television apps, and streaming services, viewers today have never had more choices of what to watch. Interestingly, the survey actually found that many people (15%) tend to get frustrated by having too many options. On that note, the average adult will spend 2,943 hours of their life just deciding what to watch!

The survey was conducted by OnePoll.

Source: StudyFinds

Commentary below by Michael Snyder

If you want to waste your life, a great way to do that is to spend tens of thousands of hours watching television.  Today, it is so difficult to get people to leave their homes and get active in their communities, because most of us are absolutely glued to one screen or another.  After a long day at school or a hard day at work, most of us understandably want to relax, and from a very early age most of us have been trained to turn to the television as our main source of relaxation.  But of course there is great danger in allowing anyone to pump thousands upon thousands of hours of “programming” into our minds.  More than 90 percent of the “programming” that we consume is controlled by just a handful of exceedingly powerful corporations, and those corporations are owned by the elite of the world.  So when you endlessly consume their “programming”, you are willingly being bombarded by news and entertainment that reflects their beliefs, their values and their agendas.  They openly admit that they are trying to shape the future of society, and up to this point they have been extremely successful.

Unfortunately, we live at a time when most people need television or some other insidious addiction to take their minds off of the gnawing emptiness that they feel deep inside of them.  As I was doing some research the other day, a comment that someone posted on an Internet message board really struck a chord with me

As a kid life seems so amazing and you can dream of big things and have faith. The older you get it seems the world tries to take away your faith. I have had 8 jobs in my life starting in high school and I’m just sick of this ****. I’m lucky to make 100 a day . I know that’s poverty level. But I manage. But thinking ahead I have to do this every day for the next 30 years . How the hell do you guys and gals cope with reality.

I’m on empty.

I want out.

In just a few sentences, this individual summed up what millions upon millions of Americans are feeling.

The harsh realities of modern society have absolutely sucked the life out of so many people around us, and the vast majority of Americans are barely getting by and are living lives of quiet desperation.

If television allows them to forget about their troubles for a while, it is understandable why so many use it as a crutch.

But do we have to watch so much of it?  One recent survey found that the average adult will watch more than 78,000 hours of television over the course of a lifetime…

Television has become such a common part of all of our lives that most don’t even think about just how much time they spend staring at their TV screen. Of course, all of those hours are undoubtedly adding up, and a recent survey of 2,000 British adults finds that the average TV viewer will watch an astounding 78,705 hours of programming (movies, sports, news, etc) in their lifetime. That’s a whole lot of screen time that may have been better spent on more productive endeavors.

On a day-to-day basis, the average adult watches TV for three-and-a-half hours, amounting to 1,248 hours each year.

I know that some of my readers will point out that this was a British survey, but the truth is that Americans actually watch even more television.  The following comes from Wikipedia

In the US, there is an estimated 119.9 million TV households in the TV season 2018/19.

In 2017 alone, an average U.S. consumer spent 238 minutes (3h 58min) daily watching TV.

Those numbers are absolutely staggering.  And when you break them down further they become even more alarming.  In the first survey that I mentioned above, the researchers actually discovered that the average person “will watch 11,278 different TV series”

The survey, commissioned by LG Electronics, broke down those numbers even further and concluded that the average adult these days will watch 3,639 movies at home, and 31,507 episodes of TV during their lifespan. As far as different programs, the average person will watch 11,278 different TV series as well.

Are there really 11,278 television series worth watching?

I would think that you would have to go really deep into the well to watch that many, but apparently that is what many people are doing.

Of course I am not entirely against television.  For example, I think that “Poldark” is an absolute masterpiece.  But everything should be done in moderation.

The fact that we are endlessly watching so much television could help to explain why our society has become so “dumbed down”.  Yesterday, I discussed a recent study that found that 15-year-old U.S. students are about four grade levels behind 15-year-old Chinese students in math.

I bet those Chinese students are spending a lot more time studying and a lot less time watching television.

At this point, America has truly become an “idiocracy”.

For example, have you heard what the hottest new toy for this holiday season is?

It is actually a “fart launcher” that allows children to blast foul smelling air at one another.  The following comes from the New York Post

Toy insiders and wincing parents tell The Post that the Buttheads Fart Launcher 3000 — a Nerf gun-like gadget that shoots farts instead of darts — is topping off kids’ wish lists this year.

“This is my worst nightmare,” mom Angie Wong, the 42-year-old founder of the private Facebook group Brooklyn Moms, tells The Post. She recently caved and got the gas-blasting gizmo for her 5-year-old son, Will, and 7-year-old daughter, Maddie. “I can see that thing [being] used on my face one unsuspecting morning.”

Of course a “fart launcher” is not the end of the world, but as I document regularly in my articles, there are literally thousands of signs that the fabric of our society is coming apart all around us.

If our society continues to degenerate at this rate, there is only one way that our story can end.

Sadly, most people seem to think that everything is going to be just fine, because that is what their televisions are telling them to think.

Most of us are willingly plugging ourselves into “the matrix” for multiple hours every day, and so it shouldn’t be a surprise that most of us see the world the way that the elite want us to see it.

If you want to start making positive changes in your life, breaking free of your addictions is one of the most important things that you can do.

And at this point, for many Americans watching television is one of the most insidious addictions of all.

Source: EndOfTheAmericanDream.com

Weird: Fox News Pushes ‘IMPEACH’ Message With DVR Playback

Fox News appears to be subversively promoting President Trump’s impeachment in its DVR recordings, according to a concerned Trump supporter.

“Strangest thing happening with our TV,” Lora Connor tweeted Saturday. “Every time we hit the pause button this picture of protesters with a big sign saying #IMPEACH pops up. That’s not even what we were watching! We tried changing channels but it’s only happening on #FoxNews. Super Creepy!”

The questionable “glitch” is unsurprising, given the network’s open secret of pushing mainstream media talking points against Trump in much of its programming, save for its primetime lineup of Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity, and Laura Ingraham.

Earlier this week, Carlson criticized “repugnant” Fox host Shepard Smith for his one-sided coverage of the ongoing Trump-Ukraine matter.

President Trump himself has also been questioning Fox News in recent months, claiming that the network “isn’t working for us anymore.”

Source: Infowars

Study: The average U.S. adult will spend three hours and 43 minutes a day on mobile devices this year

It’s official: This year marks the first time that Americans will spend more time staring down at their phones and tablets than they will watching television.

The average U.S. adult will spend three hours and 43 minutes on mobile devices this year, according to EMarketer Inc., which is eight minutes longer than the three hours and 35 minutes that will be spent in front of the TV. And about 70% of their time will be spent on their smartphones, alone.

That shakes out to Americans spending nine less minutes tuning into shows, sporting events and movies on the tube, and eight more minutes streaming them on Netflix NFLX, +0.16%, Hulu and Amazon AMZN, -0.96%, or catching clips on Twitter TWTR, -1.46%  and YouTube, compared to last year.

“We’ve expected that mobile would overtake TV for a while, but seeing it happen is still surprising,” said Yoram Wurmser, eMarketer principal analyst, in a statement. “As recently as 2014, the average U.S. adult watched nearly 2 hours more TV than they spent on their phones.”

Smartphone apps have been drawing the most eyeballs away from television, sucking people in for almost three hours a day (two hours and 57 minutes, to be exact). But not all online content is so engaging; users spend just 26 minutes on mobile browsers.

And within those apps, people are getting lost listening to digital audio, like music and podcasts on Spotify SPOT, +1.57% and Pandora, followed by social network activity on platforms such as Facebook FB, +0.23%, Instagram and Snapchat SNAP, +3.25%.

EMarketer predicts that smartphone use will continue to dominate media consumption, although it will plateau in 2020 as users become more concerned about their screen time. This has already led Apple AAPL, +0.07% and Google GOOGL, +0.29%   to roll out features that let users monitor and limit the time they spend on their devices.

Source: https://www.marketwatch.com/story/for-the-first-time-ever-americans-will-spend-more-time-on-mobile-devices-than-watching-tv-2019-06-05

VIZIO Ordered to Pay $2.2Mil to FTC, NJ to Settle Charges It Collected Viewing Histories on 11 Million Smart TV’s without Users’ Consent

Consumers have bought more than 11 million internet-connected Vizio televisions since 2010. But according to a complaint filed by the FTC and the New Jersey Attorney General, consumers didn’t know that while they were watching their TVs, Vizio was watching them. The lawsuit challenges the company’s tracking practices and offers insights into how established consumer protection […]