Study: Additive in Automobile Tires, not Climate Change, Killing West Coast Salmon

From the “where the rubber meets the road” department, comes this bombshell finding that flies in the face of claims about the universal boogeyman of “climate change” killing salmon due to it supposedly raising water temperature in streams where they spawn.

Just last year, PBS and Popular Science were screaming about “climate change” being the cause with headlines like Climate Change is Killing Salmon in the Pacific Northwest and Climate change is cooking salmon in the Pacific Northwest

It seems they were wrong, dead wrong.

New University of Washington research published December 3rd in the journal Science, exonerates “climate change” in the salmon killing caper and finds a surprise villain; an additive to automobile tires, not “climate change.” In fact, the researchers specifically ruled out climate-driven temperature increase as a cause.

Basically, the process is like this: stormwater runoff carries tire wear rubber particles into streams from the nearby roads, where a chemical called 6PPD-quinone, a biproduct from the 6PPD preservative added on tires to prevent breakdown by ozone, leeches into the water. It has been determined that this chemical is highly toxic to salmon. Researchers say they identified 6PPD-quinone as the “smoking gun” behind salmon deaths in freshwater streams.

Here are some relevant quotes from the University of Washington press release, Tire-related chemical is largely responsible for adult coho salmon deaths in urban streamsbold mine:

“We had determined it couldn’t be explained by high temperatures, low dissolved oxygen or any known contaminant, such as high zinc levels,” said co-senior author Jenifer McIntyre, an assistant professor at WSU’s School of the Environment, based in Puyallup. “Then we found that urban stormwater runoff could recreate the symptoms and the acute mortality.

“[We]…found something called 6PPD, which is used to keep tires from breaking down too quickly.

“It’s like a preservative for tires,” Tian said. “Similar to how food preservatives keep food from spoiling too quickly, 6PPD helps tires last by protecting them from ground-level ozone.”

“But when 6PPD reacts with ozone, the researchers found that it was transformed into multiple chemicals, including 6PPD-quinone (pronounced “kwih-known”), the toxic chemical that is responsible for killing the salmon.

This chemical is not limited to the Puget Sound region. The team also tested roadway runoff from Los Angeles and urban creeks near San Francisco, and 6PPD-quinone was present there as well. This finding is unsurprising, the researchers said, because 6PPD appears to be used in all tires and tire wear particles are likely present in creeks near busy roads across the world.”

The findings suggest this is a worldwide problem, and since this research focused only on salmon, who knows where else in nature this chemical might be causing trouble.

Historically, climate activists like to use “climate change” as an immediate go-to cause for anything that they can’t explain, which is why I refer to it as the “universal boogeyman”. Now that real science without a climate change agenda has been published on the salmon issue, we can move from a baseless blame-game to a solution.

Source: https://wattsupwiththat.com/2020/12/10/bombshell-finding-automobile-tires-not-climate-change-is-killing-west-coast-salmon/

EPA Announces it Will Stop Monitoring Drinking Water for Atrazine

Fox News host Tucker Carlson blasted the Environmental Protection Agency over its decision to stop monitoring the dangerous herbicide known as Atrazine in the U.S. water supply.

“Despite its name, the Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t just exist to protect the environment,” Carlson said Friday. “It also exists to protect you, by policing against the many pollutants that are generated by modern life. But soon, the EPA will be doing a little bit less to protect you, and a little bit more to protect Big Agriculture.”

“Buried within a recent 60-page regulatory document, the EPA has announced it will soon end its Atrazine monitoring program, which tests drinking water to make sure that atrazine levels are safe.”

“Atrazine is a pesticide,” the Fox News host continued. “It’s the second most-common one in the U.S. Half of America’s corn crop is treated with it.”

“For newborn boys, atrazine exposure in utero is correlated with lower birth weight, undescended testicles, and deformities to sex organs,” he said.

Despite the fact that “30 million Americans had measurable amounts” of Atrazine found in their water systems, the EPA will now allow 50% more of the herbicide to enter the U.S. water supply at the behest of Big Agriculture.

“For the EPA, that’s not a concern,” the Fox News host concluded. “Their concern, is corn.”

And as Alex Jones has explained, Atrazine’s dangerous effects have been measured in certain frog populations which became hermaphroditic or otherwise refused to mate with the opposite sex when exposed to the chemical.

Study Says Even ‘Safe’ Drinking Water Poses Cancer Risk

A new report from an environmental advocacy watchdog group cautions that carcinogenic products in tap water may altogether increase cancer risk for thousands of U.S. residents over a lifetime.

In a peer-reviewed study published in the journal Heliyon Thursday, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) found that 22 carcinogens commonly found in tap water — including arsenic, byproducts of water disinfectants and radionuclides such as uranium and radium — could cumulatively result in over 100,000 cancer cases over the span of a lifetime.

Although most tap water meets legal standards set by the federal government, EWG researchers found that contaminates present in tap water create a measurable risk for cancer.

“The vast majority of community water systems meet legal standards,” said Olga Naidenko, the vice president for science investigations at EWG, in a statement. “Yet the latest research shows that contaminants present in the water at those concentrations — perfectly legal — can still harm human health.”

An earlier study conducted by EWG found that a cumulative analysis of contaminants in California tap water found heightened risk of cancer for 15,000.

Experts say that the risk of these carcinogens have been under debate for decades. They caution that the standards set for community water systems, which are regulated nationally by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), are complicated and require a balance between cost and safety.

Tap water not as safe as you think

The study, funded by the Park Foundation, compiled a list of 22 contaminants with carcinogenic risks present in 48,363 community water systems in the United States, which EWG estimates serve about 86% of the U.S. population. Based on a cumulative risk assessment, EWG found that per 10,000 people, four will have cancer over the span of the lifetime due to the contaminants in water.

“Drinking water contains complex mixtures of contaminants, yet government agencies currently assess the health hazards of tap water pollutants one by one,” said Sydney Evans, the lead author of the paper, in a statement. “In the real world, people are exposed to combinations of chemicals, so it is important that we start to assess health impacts by looking at the combined effects of multiple pollutants.”

The majority of water systems, they add, are in compliance with EPA standards. The EPA, in a statement to USA TODAY, said that legal limits are set for over 90 contaminants in drinking water.

EWG said that 87% of the cancer risk present in tap water comes from arsenic and byproducts of common disinfectants.

Long-term exposure to arsenic, per the World Health Organization, can cause skin cancer, as well as cancer of the bladder and the lungs. Meanwhile, byproducts of disinfectants have been classified by the NIH and EPA as known and possible human carcinogens that can cause liver and bladder cancer.

This study does not take into account the possible contaminants present in groundwater from private wells, nor does it take into account the heightened risk of carcinogens in vulnerable populations such as infants and children.

Clean water is complicated

In recent years, multiple crises, from Newark, New Jersey to Flint, Michigan have revealed the complications and failures in the management of public water systems, from the different water sources used by municipalities to the pipes that deliver water to homes.

The EPA regulates public drinking water under the Safe Drinking Water Act, which was enacted in 1974. It requires the EPA to set standards for contaminants through the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations, which minimizes risk for contaminants.

A spokesperson with the EPA told USA TODAY that water regulations focus primarily on the contaminants that may cause the greatest public health risk.

The standard is splintered into two categories: the maximum contaminant level (MCL), which is enforceable by law and is less stringent, and the maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG), which is only a public health guideline.

For instance, the federally-mandated MCLG for arsenic is 0 micrograms per liter; however, the MCL is 10 micrograms per liter. Meanwhile, the EWG recommends that only four ten-thousandths of a microgram (0.0004 micrograms) of arsenic be allowed in water.

Prof. David Sedlak, a professor of environmental engineering at University of California, Berkeley, and the deputy director of the National Science Foundation-funded urban water research center ReNUWIt, says that regulations for drinking water in the United States are based on a complex balance between health risks from possible carcinogens and the cost of implementing new water cleaning systems.

Sedlak, who is not affiliated with the EWG study, told USA TODAY that arsenic and carcinogenic radionucleides such as radium are both naturally occurring in water systems. Setting the levels of regulation for these carcinogens especially challenging.

“For disinfectants,” he said, “they’ve been in scrutiny over the decades and it’s part of the reason why many cities have switched from chlorine to ozone.”

The Water Research Center says that using ozone water treatment in lieu of chlorine reduces the risk of chemicals leaching into water supplies.

What can be done?

EWG suggests installing a water filter that can remove contaminants found in an individual water source, but some suggested by the group that specifically remove arsenic can cost hundreds or thousands of dollars to purchase and install.

On a broader scale, experts advise solutions aimed at reducing the level of contaminants that are present in tap water.

“We need to prioritize source water protection, to make sure that these contaminants don’t get into the drinking water supplies to begin with,” Naidenko said in a statement.

Sedlak told USA TODAY that the technologies to remove carcinogenic substances from water do, in fact, exist. The biggest hurdle to implementing them, he said, is that they can be costly.

‘Is the Earth unique?’: First water detected on potentially ‘habitable’ planet

“Typically,” he said to USA TODAY, “these additional treatment processes are paid for by consumers — and in many cases, members of the public have been unwilling to see large rate increases in their water bills.”

The EPA agrees. In a handout on the EPA website explaining the Safe Drinking Water Act, it explains that water systems in America rely on community members to ensure that local water suppliers keep their water safe.

“The public is responsible for helping local water suppliers to set priorities, make decisions on funding and system improvements, and establish programs to protect drinking water sources,” the EPA writes.

“If people are aware of the health impacts (of tap water), they might be willing to pay more for water treatment,” said Sedlak. “But at this point, the EPA has made their decision.”

Source: USA Today

Another Jury Finds Monsanto’s ROUNDUP Weedkiller Caused a Man’s Cancer

The Monsanto corporation’s most notorious product has again been found guilty of causing a man’s cancer. Dealing another major blow to Bayer, who bought Monsanto in 2018, a San Francisco jury has unanimously ruled that Roundup and its primary ingredient glyphosate were the likely cause of a defendant’s cancer. Edwin Hardeman, a 70-year-old Sonoma County, California […]

New Tests Reveal 70% of Fruits and Veggies are Contaminated with Toxic Chemicals

Despite the false propaganda of pesticide and herbicide producers who claim agricultural chemicals disappear after being sprayed on crops, a new research project from the Environmental Working Group has found that 70% of U.S. fresh produce is contaminated with pesticide chemicals. All pesticide chemicals are toxic to life. Otherwise, they wouldn’t kill the living organisms […]