CommonPass

A digital “health passport” framework initiated by The Commons Project, the World Economic Forum and The Rockefeller Foundation, which during the first week of July 2020 convened more than 350 leaders from the public and private sectors in 52 countries to design a common framework “for safe border reopening” around the world. The proposed framework involves the following:

  1. Every nation must publish their health screening criteria for entry into the country using a standard format on a common framework
  2. Each country must register trusted facilities that conduct COVID-19 lab testing for foreign travel and administer vaccines listed in the CommonPass registry
  3. Each country will accept health screening status from foreign visitors through apps and services built on the CommonPass framework
  4. Patient identification is to be collected at the time of sample collection and/or vaccination using an international standard
  5. The CommonPass framework will be integrated into flight and hotel reservation and check-in processes

Eventually, the CommonPass framework will be integrated with already existing personal health apps such as Apple Health and CommonHealth. If you want to travel, your personal health record will be evaluated and compared to a country’s entry requirements, and if you don’t meet them, you’ll be directed to an approved testing and vaccination location.

A screen grab from the video illustrates the general idea of how this will all work. When you get your test result or vaccine, that data is uploaded to an app on your cellphone. The app generates a barcode that is then scanned at the airport, at hotel check-in and wherever else vaccine status verification is deemed necessary.

That the Rockefeller Foundation is one of the three founders of CommonPass should surprise no one, considering they basically laid the groundwork for it in their April 21, 2020, white paper2 “National COVID-19 Testing Action Plan — Strategic Steps to Reopen Our Workplaces and Our Communities.”

That white paper laid out a strategic framework that is clearly intended to become part of a permanent surveillance and social control structure that severely limits personal liberty and freedom of choice.

It also warns that elimination of privacy will be required, stating that “Some privacy concerns must be set aside for an infectious agent as virulent as COVID-19 …” The tracking system proposed by The Rockefeller Foundation also demands access to other medical data, which tells us the system will have any number of other uses besides tracking COVID-19 cases.

Worldwide Tracking Begins

This digital clearance system is currently being tested by United Airlines3 on flights between London and Newark, and Cathay Pacific on flights between Hong Kong and Singapore.4 As reported by Tott News, November 15, 2020:5

“Volunteer travelers landing at Newark Liberty International Airport on United Airlines Flight 15 from London Heathrow used the CommonPass health pass on their mobile phone to document their COVID-19 status and share it with airline staff upon disembarking.

Continue Reading at Mercola.com…

See also:

Obamagate

A controversy that refers to several scandals during President Barack Obama tenure, notably the misuse of government agencies, media manipulation, illegal wiretaping, and domestic spying on American citizens to harass political opponents and critics. By the election year of 2016, Obama officials vastly expanded the use of the foreign intelligence gathering apparatus as a weapon against domestic political opponents. In 2013, there were 9,600 FISA search queries involving 195 Americans. But in 2016, there are 30,355 searches of 5,288 Americans.

With the release of DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s first installment report, it became abundantly clear the Obama intelligence community attempted to whitewash crimes Hillary Clinton was accused of and to meddle in the outcome of America’s democratic processes.

Some have drawn parallels between Obamagate and the Watergate scandal of the 1970s; the FISA courts were created as a post-Watergate reform. Had the Watergate burglars been granted outside contractor access to the FISA database, it would make a closer comparison. In Watergate, Nixon turned to outside contractors, the Plumbers unit, after the FBI refused Nixon’s request to spy on political opponents; in Obamagate the FBI colluded with outside contractors, FusionGPS, to spy on Obama and DNC opponents. In Watergate, the CIA declined Nixon’s request to help cover up the crime by deceiving FBI investigators; in Obamagate, the CIA director masterminded the crime in collusion with the FBI and Department of Justice.1

2015 The Progressive Police State

What Nixon contemplated – misuse of the FBI and CIA against domestic opponents – but failed to accomplish yet was nevertheless forced from office, Obama achieved beyond anyone’s wildest expectations. The post-Watergate reform Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act to supervise Executive Branch power was systematically and wantonly circumvented to harass political opponents in an attempt to dictate the outcome of the 2016 presidential election, and blackmail the winner with illegally gathered evidence should the Obama coterie of conspirators fail.

Obamagate timeline 2015 – the progressive police state documents how the Leftist authoritarian utopia under President Barack Obama was firmly in place to cover-up the crimes of Hillary Rodham Clinton, compromise whomever the 2016 GOP nominee would be, and rig the 2016 election for Hillary Clinton. This assault on American democracy is indisputable.

The origins of intelligence lures, FBI provocateurs or Spygate. Sally Yates terminates independent Inspector General oversight of the DOJ-National Security Division. Nellie Ohr hired as an FBI contractor to begin illegal FISA 702 surveillance on Michael Cohen and others. Papadopoulos set up.

Comey gives immunity to Clinton cronies who destroyed evidence under Congressional subpoena.

During a period of November 2015 through April 18, 2016, Justice Department political insiders and outside political contractors, including FusionGPS, accessed the NSA and FBI database using FISA-702(17) “About Queries”. They gathered information on political opposition of candidate Hillary Clinton, including Donald Trump campaign officials and affiliates. NSA Director Mike Rogers suspected illegal abuse and instructed the NSA compliance officer to conduct a full FISA audit. The NSA began querying DOJ and FBI activity.

The unlawfully obtained FISA intelligence information ended up with Fusion GPS. The key personnel in FusionGPS are husband and wife Glenn Simpson and Mary Jacoby. Mary Jacoby’s relationship with the Clintons’ goes back to the Rose Law Firm.

January 2016

CIA operative Eric Ciaramella, working in the White House, requested Ukrainian officials to re-open an investigation into Paul Manafort which the FBI had dismissed in 2014. The FBI under James Comey re-opened the investigation at the same time Ciaramella met with Ukrainian officials in the White House. Ciaramella later became the Adam Schiff’s alleged “whistleblower” in the Trump impeachment inquiry after the failure of Special Counsel Robert Mueller to produce sufficient evidence to remove President Trump from office in 2019.

  • 4 January. John Podesta emails Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, “Look forward to working with you to elect the first woman President of the United States,” Sandberg replies she was “thrilled” by the progress that Clinton was making.
  • 7 January. NSA Inspector General, George Ellard, released a report on NSA Controls & FISA compliance:

    “We identified another [redacted] queries that were performed outside the targeting authorization periods in [Executive Order] 12333 data, which is prohibited by the E.O. 12333 minimization procedures. We also identified queries performed using [United States Persons] selectors [phone numbers, emails] in [FISA Amendments Act of 2008] §702 upstream data, which is prohibited by the FAA §702 minimization procedures.”

    Material FISA abuses were routinely taking place. Following IG Ellard’s report, Adm. Mike Rogers implemented a tightening of internal rules at the NSA. By law, John Carlin of the DOJ-NSD should have informed the FISA court immediately of the results of the IG’s Report, but the court was not informed until NSA Dir. Adm. Mike Rogers personally told the court on October 23, 2016, two days after the Obama DOJ hoaxed the FISA court into granting FISA Title I authority over Carter Page, which then extended throughout the Trump transition well into the first year of Trump’s presidency.

  • 12 January. Christopher Steele emails Bruce Ohr:

    “I heard from Adam WALDMAN [a Deripaska lawyer/lobbyist] yesterday that OD [ Oleg Deripaska ] is applying for another official US visa ice [sic] APEC [Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation] business at the end of February.”

    Steele said Deripaska was being “encouraged by the Agency guys who told Adam [Waldman] that the USG [United States Government stance on [Deripaska] is softening.” Steele concluded: “A positive development it seems.” Steele also asked Ohr when he might be coming to London, or somewhere in Europe, “as I would be keen to meet up here and talk business.” Ohr replied warmly the same day and said he would likely travel to Europe, but not the U.K., at least twice in February.

Read more at Conservapedia…

TikTok

The video-sharing platform owned by the Chinese social media giant ByteDance, is one of the most popular social media services in the world, with an estimated 800 million users. However, its zealous data collection, use of Chinese infrastructure, and its parent company’s close ties to the Chinese Communist Party make it a perfect tool for massive surveillance and data collection by the Chinese government.

After reviewing TikTok’s data collection policies, lawsuits, cybersecurity white papers, past security vulnerabilities, and its privacy policy, Protonmail found TikTok to be a grave privacy threat that likely shares data with the Chinese government. They recommend everyone approach TikTok with great caution, especially if your threat model includes the questionable use of your personal data or Chinese government surveillance.

As with just about every social media platform, the answer is: “a lot.” According to its privacy policy, even if you just download and open the app but never create an account, TikTok will collect your:

  • IP address
  • Browsing history (i.e., the content you viewed on TikTok)
  • Mobile carrier
  • Location data if you are using a mobile device (including GPS coordinates and WiFi and mobile cell data)
  • Info on the device you used to access TikTok (for Android devices, this includes your IMEI number, which is essentially your device’s fingerprint so it can be identified, and potentially your IMSI number, which is used to track users from one phone to another)

To open an account, you must enter a phone number or email and your date of birth. Once you have created an account, TikTok asks your permission for access to your social media accounts (like Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, etc.), your phone’s contact list, and GPS data.

Once you start using the app, TikTok logs details about:

  • Every video you upload
  • How long you watch videos
  • Which videos you like
  • Which videos you share
  • Any messages you exchange in the app

Finally, if you buy coins, the in-app currency you can use to support your favorite video creators, TikTok will store your payment information.

According to TikTok, if you delete your account, the company will delete your account data, videos, and information within 30 days. This claim is impossible to independently verify, as is the case with most social media companies.

TikTok’s data collection is extreme, even for a social media platform that collects its users’ data to serve them with targeted ads. And TikTok explicitly states in its privacy policy that it shares your browsing data and email address with third parties so that it can serve you with targeted advertising.

Continue Reading at ZeroHedge…

Fedcoin

A proposed digital dollar where the central bank (Federal Reserve Bank in the USA) would issue its own cryptocurrency and/or protocol. This would allow the international bankers, perhaps the major conspirators in the new world order conspiracy, to track many of your purchases in real time and share that information with government agencies. It was initially included in the first coronavirus spending bill. While the proposal was dropped from the final version of the bill, there is still great interest in fedcoin on Capitol Hill. Some progressives have embraced fedcoin as a way to provide Americans with a “universal basic income.”

Both the Senate Banking Committee and the House Financial Services Committee held hearings on fedcoin in June 2020. This was the first step toward making fedcoin a reality.

The U.S. Federal Reserve will not only issue its own cryptocurrency but will also make sure Americans use it. That’s the prediction of currency guru Doug Casey who has an uncanny record of being correct about economic and political trends. His latest book, Surviving Fedcoin: How to Protect Yourself (and Profit) from America’s Coming Currency Change, is a public bet that the U.S. government will issue its own bitcoin which Casey views as “the last arrow” in its money quiver.

How will the dynamic play out? He speculates,

“To start with, I suspect it’s going to be a parallel currency. Perhaps usable just within the U.S. which, in effect, would be a form of foreign exchange controls even more effective than the inability of Americans to open up foreign bank and brokerage accounts today [due to monetary control through FATCA]…I think it’s a near certainty that they’re going to do something like this and soon.”

Fedcoin would not be an actual coin. Instead, it would be a special account created and maintained for each American by the Federal Reserve. Each month, Fed employees could tap a few keys on a computer and — voila — each American would have dollars added to his Federal Reserve account. This is the 21st century equivalent of throwing money from helicopters.

Fedcoin could “crowd out” private cryptocurrencies. Also, it would limit the ability of private citizens to protect themselves from the Federal Reserve-caused decline in the dollar’s value.

A key argument for Fedcoin is the perceived need to stabilize a cryptocurrency by pegging it to traditionally-issued money. The pegging would not necessarily be voluntary. Mathematician and economist Sina Motamedi explains, “just like what happened with paper currencies, central banks will eventually step in to create their own crypto-currency protocols and forbid the use of any others. For simplicity, let’s call the central bank crypto-currency protocol BitDollar. Of course, these BitDollars would always be redeemable in regular dollars by the central bank, at least at first.

JP Koning is more blunt. “Now is the time for the rebels to figure out how to create a stable-price version of bitcoin, before Darth Vader does it himself. Otherwise they may someday find themselves closing down their bitcoin startups in order to write code for the Empire.

Fedcoin would not magically increase the number of available goods and services. What it would do is drive up prices. The damage this would do to middle- and lower-income Americans would dwarf any benefit they receive from their monthly “gift” from the Fed. The rise in prices could lead to Congress regularly increasing fedcoin payments to Americans. These increases would cause prices to keep rising even more until we face hyperinflation and a dollar crisis. Of course, we are already on the path to an economic crisis thanks to the Fed. Fedcoin will hasten and worsen the crisis.

Fedcoin poses a great threat to privacy. The Federal Reserve could know when fedcoin is used, who is using it, and what they use it for. This information could be shared with government agencies, such as the FBI or IRS.

The government could use the ability to know how Americans are spending fedcoin to limit our ability to purchase goods and services disfavored by politicians and bureaucrats. Anyone who doubts this should recall the Obama administration’s Operation Choke Point. Operation Choke Point involved financial regulators “alerting” banks that dealing with certain businesses, such as gun stores, would put the banks at “reputational risk” and could subject them to greater regulation.

Is it so hard to believe that the ability to track purchases would be used in the future to “discourage” individuals from buying guns, fatty foods, or tobacco, or from being customers of corporations whose CEOs are not considered “woke” by the thought police? Fedcoin could also be used to “encourage” individuals to patronize “green” business, thus fulfilling Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s goal of involving the Fed in the fight against climate change.

Fedcoin will threaten private cryptocurrencies, increase inflation, and give government new powers over our financial transactions. Fedcoin will also speed up destruction of the fiat money system. Whatever gain fedcoin may bring to average Americans will come at terrible cost to liberty and prosperity.

Doug Casey addresses America’s central banking system but the circumstances favoring a U.S. Fedcoin are mirrored throughout the Western world. He doesn’t buy the stability theory. The U.S. government is bankrupt with liabilities far exceeding assets. Casey explains,

Social Security is bankrupt… Forty-seven percent of the people in this country are net recipients of money from the government… Officially, one-third of all the US government’s assets are student loans; little-known fact. About $1 trillion worth of them.

The greenback is semi-stabilized by being “the world’s money” but its privileged status is being shaken by nations such as China and Russia who aggressively seek alternative mediums for global commerce. Casey believes that yesterday’s monetary controls – quantitative easing and interest rates at near zero or below – cannot sustain a bankrupt dollar with waning global relevance. Yesterday’s methods are “going to come to an end….What can they [the feds] do?”

What the feds can do is cryptocurrency; Fedcoin is what’s coming to a start. And, according to Casey, the primary benefit to government would be a centralization of supply and a transparency of demand (or transactions), which could centralize control of the economy to an unprecedented extent.

Why would people use the cryptocurrency? Fedcoin would almost certainly emerge as a parallel currency which would be adopted due to government requirements for its use in paying taxes or accessing entitlements such as Social Security. Increasingly, however, Fedcoin would become a tool to push toward a cashless society because physical money provides a privacy that prevents government control.

Casey focuses on the harm inflicted on the prosperity and freedom of average people. “[P]eople that are dealing in what’s called the underground economy are actually providing useful goods and services,” he observes. “[I]f the government extracts its 30 or 40 percent in taxes, which they will be able to do now with Fedcoin, [that] is going to hurt the economy, not help it. It will help the U.S. government, but that’s different from the economy in America.” The government would grow richer.

It would also become a more powerful engine of social control. In terms of privacy, Fedcoin could become the anti-cash. “If I’ve got a $100 bill in my wallet or a bunch of 10s and 20s,” Casey explains, “I can spend them on anything I want with anybody I want and nobody knows. With blockchain….[the feds] know exactly who’s getting the money and what it’s being spent for. It can be programmed [perhaps through a mechanism simiar to smart contracts] so that certain transactions can’t take place….So you are pretty well blocked in.”

Fat people could be prevented from buying sugar; gun owners could be cut off from ammunition; teenagers could be banned from buying beer, cigarettes or video games. The possibilities seem almost infinite. In doing so, Fedcoin would merely extend existing policies under food stamp programs that prohibit spending on alcohol, casinos or strip clubs. The efficiency would be so much greater, however, that the difference of degree would become one of kind. The government could “prohibit anything without even passing a law….If your Fedcoin smartphone or chip isn’t programmed to let you buy that, how are you going to get it?” Politically controversial items, like a gun registry, could become irrelevant.

Bitcoin and blockchain are equally liberating to the individual but revolutionary technologies also challenge the status quo. And, so, entrenched powers attempt to co-opt their use. Whether governments will succeed is not clear; they may be thwarted by their own incompetence or by the intrinsic decentralization of cryptocurrencies. It seems clear, however, that governments will make the attempt. And when they do, the best response is a better technology that sprints forward and leaves those who wish to ‘tame’ it coughing on its dust.

Sources:

War on Cash

a concerted campaign to shift consumers towards a digital mode of commerce that can easily be monitored, tracked, tabulated, mined for data, hacked, hijacked and confiscated when convenient. According to economist Steve Forbes, “The real reason for this war on cash—start with the big bills and then work your way down—is an ugly power grab by Big Government. People will have less privacy: Electronic commerce makes it easier for Big Brother to see what we’re doing, thereby making it simpler to bar activities it doesn’t like, such as purchasing salt, sugar, big bottles of soda and Big Macs.

Much like the war on drugs and the war on terror, this so-called “war on cash” is being sold to the public as a means of fighting terrorists, drug dealers, tax evaders and now COVID-19 germs.

Digital currency provides the government and its corporate partners with the ultimate method to track, control you and punish you.

In recent years, just the mere possession of significant amounts of cash could implicate you in suspicious activity and label you a criminal. The rationale (by police) is that cash is the currency for illegal transactions given that it’s harder to track, can be used to pay illegal immigrants, and denies the government its share of the “take,” so doing away with paper money will help law enforcement fight crime and help the government realize more revenue.

Despite what we know about the government and its history of corruption, bumbling, fumbling and data breaches, not to mention how easily technology can be used against us, the campaign to do away with cash is really not a hard sell.

It’s not a hard sell, that is, if you know the right buttons to push, and the government has become a grand master in the art of getting the citizenry to do exactly what it wants. Remember, this is the same government that plans to use behavioral science tactics to “nudge” citizens to comply with the government’s public policy and program initiatives.

It’s also not a hard sell if you belong to the Digital Generation, that segment of the population for whom technology is second nature and “the first generation born into a world that has never not known digital life.”

And it’s certainly not a hard sell if you belong to the growing class of Americans who use their cell phones to pay bills, purchase goods, and transfer funds.

In much the same way that Americans have opted into government surveillance through the convenience of GPS devices and cell phones, digital cash—the means of paying with one’s debit card, credit card or cell phone—is becoming the de facto commerce of the American police state.

Not too long ago, it was estimated that smart phones would replace cash and credit cards altogether by 2020. Right on schedule, a growing number of businesses are adopting no-cash policies, including certain airlines, hotels, rental car companies, restaurants and retail stores. In Sweden, even the homeless and churches accept digital cash.

Making the case for “never, ever carrying cash” in lieu of a digital wallet, journalist Lisa Rabasca Roepe argues that cash is inconvenient, ATM access is costly, and it’s now possible to reimburse people using digital apps such as Venmo. Thus, there’s no longer a need for cash. “More and more retailers and grocery stores are embracing Apple Pay, Google Wallet, Samsung Pay, and Android Pay,” notes Roepe. “PayPal’s app is now accepted at many chain stores including Barnes & Noble, Foot Locker, Home Depot, and Office Depot. Walmart and CVS have both developed their own payment apps while their competitors Target and RiteAid are working on their own apps.”

It’s not just cash that is going digital, either.

A growing number of states are looking to adopt digital driver’s licenses that would reside on your mobile phone. These licenses would include all of the information contained on your printed license, along with a few “extras” such as real-time data downloaded directly from your state’s Department of Motor Vehicles.

Of course, reading between the lines, having a digital driver’s license will open you up to much the same jeopardy as digital cash: it will make it possible for the government to better track your movements, monitor your activities and communications and ultimately shut you down.

So what’s the deal here?

Despite all of the advantages that go along with living in a digital age—namely, convenience—it’s hard to imagine how a cashless world navigated by way of a digital wallet doesn’t signal the beginning of the end for what little privacy we have left and leave us vulnerable to the likes of government thieves and data hackers.

First, privacy not only refers to the things that you don’t want people to know about, those little things you do behind closed doors that are neither illegal nor harmful but embarrassing or intimate. It also refers to the things that are deeply personal and which no one need know about, certainly not the government and its constabulary of busybodies, nannies, Peeping Toms, jail wardens and petty bureaucrats.

Second, we’re already witnessing how easy it will be for government agents to manipulate digital wallets for their own gain. For example, civil asset forfeiture schemes are becoming even more profitable for police agencies thanks to ERAD (Electronic Recovery and Access to Data) devices supplied by the Department of Homeland Security that allow police to not only determine the balance of any magnetic-stripe card (i.e., debit, credit and gift cards) but also freeze and seize any funds on pre-paid money cards. In fact, the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that it does not violate the Fourth Amendment for police to scan or swipe your credit card.

Third, as commentator Paul Craig Roberts observed, while Americans have been distracted by the government’s costly war on terror, “the financial system, working hand-in-hand with policymakers, has done more damage to Americans than terrorists could possibly inflict.” Ultimately, as Roberts—who served as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy under Ronald Reagan—makes clear, the war on cash is about giving the government the ultimate control of the economy and complete access to the citizenry’s pocketbook.

Fourth, if there’s a will, there’s a way. So far, every technological convenience that has made our lives easier has also become our Achilles’ heel, opening us up to greater vulnerabilities from hackers and government agents alike. In recent years, the U.S. government has been repeatedly hacked. In 2015, the Office of Personnel Management had more than 20 million personnel files stolen, everything from Social Security numbers to birth dates and fingerprint records. In 2014, it was the White House, the State Department, the Post Office and other government agencies, along with a host of financial institutions, retailers and entertainment giants that had their files breached. And these are the people in charge of protecting oursensitive information?

Fifth, if there’s one entity that will not stop using cash for its own nefarious purposes, it’s the U.S. government. Cash is the currency used by the government to pay off its foreign “associates.” For instance, the Obama administration flew more than $400 million in cash to Iran, reportedly as part of a financial settlement with the country. Critics claim the money was ransom paid for the return of American hostages. And then there was the $12 billion in shrink-wrapped $100 bills that the U.S. flew to Iraq only to claim it had no record of what happened to the money. It just disappeared, we were told. So when government economists tell you that two-thirds of all $100 bills in circulation are overseas—more than half a trillion dollars’ worth—it’s a pretty good bet that the government played a significant part in their export.

Sixth, this drive to do away with cash is part of a larger global trend driven by international financial institutions and the United Nations that is transforming nations of all sizes, from the smallest nation to the biggest, most advanced economies.

Finally, short of returning to a pre-technological, Luddite age, there’s really no way to pull this horse back now that it’s left the gate. While doing so is near impossible, it would also mean doing without the many conveniences and advantages that are the better angels, if you will, of technology’s totalitarian tendencies: the internet, medical advances, etc.

To our detriment, we have virtually no control over who accesses our private information, how it is stored, or how it is used. Whether we ever had much control remains up for debate. However, in terms of our bargaining power over digital privacy rights, we have been reduced to a pitiful, unenviable position in which we can only hope and trust that those in power will treat our information with respect.

As I make clear in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American Peoplewe have come full circle, back to a pre-revolutionary era of taxation without any real representation.

Cash may well become a casualty of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As these COVID-19 lockdowns drag out, more and more individuals and businesses are going cashless (for convenience and in a so-called effort to avoid spreading coronavirus germs), engaging in online commerce or using digital forms of currency (bank cards, digital wallets, etc.). As a result, physical cash is no longer king.

Yet there are other, more devious, reasons for this re-engineering of society away from physical cash: a cashless society—easily monitored, controlled, manipulated, weaponized and locked down—would play right into the hands of the government (and its corporate partners).

To this end, the government and its corporate partners-in-crime have been waging a subtle war on cash for some time now.

Source: Rutherford Institute